Jul 04, 2020  
2017-2019 Catalog Addendum 
    
2017-2019 Catalog Addendum [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This section includes a brief description of each credit class offered on a regular basis at Green River College. Classes are arranged in alphabetical order according to the college department that offers the class.

Each listing includes a course number (prefix & code/number), course title, number of credits awarded, prerequisite and academic transfer distributions are also designated where applicable. Common course numbers are identified by an “&” symbol at the end of the department abbreviation.

Course numbers 100-299 are designated for Green River College programs and courses that transfer to senior institutions (transfer is sometimes limited). The 100 series is ordinarily for first-year students and the 200 series for second-year students, but this distinct varies because of differing requirements at other colleges and universities. The 300 and 400 level series are for third- and fourth-year students.

Consult the “Programs of Study ” section of this catalog and your faculty advisor for specific information about each class and about which classes will meet your requirements.

 

Early Childhood Education

  
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    ECED 212 - Montessori 2

    Credits: 4
    Continues the study of the Montessori philosophy and method focusing on the 3-6 year old child. Presents language and math lessons and exercises along with the continued overview of the Montessori classroom. Uses a contemporary approach to the method with added emphasis on cultural relevancy and antibias curriculum practices.

    Prerequisite: ECED 211  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 213 - Montessori 3

    Credits: 4
    Concludes the study of the Montessori philosophy and method focusing on the 3-6 year old child. Emphasizes cultural subject’s developmentally appropriate practices. Students study environment, equipment, materials, and teacher behaviors that support the Montessori method of education.

    Prerequisite: ECED 212  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 214 - Early Childhood Education Practicum 2

    Credits: 3
    Provides second year practical work experience in an ECE setting for the purpose of applying theoretical knowledge. Students work under the guidance and supervision of a college instructor while working with children under the age of six.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 215 - Early Childhood Education Practicum 3

    Credits: 3
    Provides second year practical work experience in an ECE setting for the purpose of applying theoretical knowledge. Students work under the guidance and supervision of a college instructor while working with children under the age of six.

    Prerequisite: ECED 214  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 220 - Introduction to Sign Language

    Credits: 2
    Introduces sign language. Presents alphabet and vocabulary using Signed English. Finger-spelling activities include a variety of games and songs.

    Satisfies Requirement: Activity
  
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    ECED 225 - Child Development Associate Course Content

    Credits: 3
    Helps students meet the requirement for the Child Development Associates (CDA) process, by earning the credits and clock hours required in five of the 13 functional areas. Covers cognitive, communication, creative, self-esteem, and social development.

  
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    ECED 230 - Child Development Associate Work Ethics

    Credits: 3
    Helps students meet the requirements for the Child Development Associates (CDA) process, by earning the credits and clock hours specific to the last four functional areas and four of the competency goals. Covers guidance and discipline, working with families, program management, and professionalism.

  
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    ECED 250 - Early Childhood Education Final Practicum

    Credits: 3
    Intended as the final course in the ECE degree program, ECED 250 allows students to present and document their abilities and experiences gained while in the ECE program. Students are expected to assume a lead teaching role in which they demonstrate application of all previous coursework emphasizing developmentally and culturally appropriate practices based on NAEYC criteria.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 260 - CDA Performance Documentation

    Credits: 3
    Provides students with information to help them prepare their Child Development Associates (CDA) resource file for submittal in order to apply for the nationally-recognized CDA credential. Helps students understand, define, and clarify the requirements established by the CDA Council. Instructor observes and assesses each student at their early learning workplace, documenting the student’s performance as it relates to CDA standards. May be taken in conjunction with one of the other CDA courses. Students may use this course to satisfy five credits of practicum in their ECE certificate or degree.

    Prerequisite: ECED 125 , ECED 225 , and ECED 230 ; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 265 - Supervised Montessori Teaching

    Credits: 4
    Provides an opportunity for leadership experience in a Montessori setting with the purpose of applying the Montessori philosophy and method in all areas of the classroom. Students are under the guidance and supervision of a Montessori-certified college instructor working with children between the ages of 3-6.

    Prerequisite: ECED 211 , ECED 212 , and ECED 213 ; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 294 - Special Topics-Education in Early Childhood 4

    Credits: 1-5
    Provides students with a basic knowledge to pursue areas of special interest in the field of education. Students participate in approved regularly scheduled workshops and seminars sponsored by the college or by a recognized institution or organization, e.g., Educational Service District, the Washington Association for the Education of Young Children or local affiliate, health department, or childcare agency.

  
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    ECED 295 - Special Topics-Education in Early Childhood 5

    Credits: 1-5
    Provides students with a basic knowledge to pursue areas of special interest in the field of education. Students participate in approved regularly scheduled workshops and seminars sponsored by the college or by a recognized institution or organization, e.g., Educational Service District, the Washington Association for the Education of Young Children or local affiliate, health department, or childcare agency.

  
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    ECED 296 - Special Topics-Education in Early Childhood 6

    Credits: 1-5
    Provides students with a basic knowledge to pursue areas of special interest in the field of education. Students participate in approved regularly scheduled workshops and seminars sponsored by the college or by a recognized institution or organization, e.g., Educational Service District, the Washington Association for the Education of Young Children or local affiliate, health department, or childcare agency.

  
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    ECED 297 - Montessori Intensive

    Credits: 6
    An intensive overview of the Montessori Method of Education that includes a synopsis of the entire Montessori curriculum for children ages 3-6 years. Through online study, video-viewing, field trips, and four full days of face to face instruction, students will be introduced into both the theory and practice of the system. Course is appropriate for those who are either new or experienced to the study of Montessori.

  
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    ECED 301 - Reflective Observation with Field Experience 1

    Credits: 2
    Students will work a minimum of 20 hours per week with children and families in an early childhood setting. Through regular group meetings, students will have the opportunity to engage in reflective practice, with faculty facilitation, around their field experience. Students will be encouraged to carefully consider the qualities and characteristics of their actions and ideas.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 302 - Reflective Observation with Field Experience 2

    Credits: 2
    Students will work a minimum of 20 hours per week with children and families in an early childhood setting. Through regular group meetings, students will have the opportunity to engage in reflective practice, with faculty facilitation, around their field experience. Students will be encouraged to carefully consider the qualities and characteristics of their actions and ideas.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education and ECED 301 ; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 303 - Reflective Observation with Field Experience 3

    Credits: 2
    Students will work a minimum of 20 hours per week with children and families in an early childhood setting. Through regular group meetings, students will have the opportunity to engage in reflective practice, with faculty facilitation, around their field experience. Students will be encouraged to carefully consider the qualities and characteristics of their actions and ideas.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education; and ECED 301  and ECED 302 ; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 305 - Introduction to Infant/Child Mental Health

    Credits: 5
    A comprehensive overview of community agencies and professionals who work with and support early learning programs and families. Students will learn and practice communication skills and strategies that enable them to connect with and encourage parents and other family members to be involved in their child’s growth and education. Special emphasis will be placed on intercultural communication.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 310 - Building Networks with Families and Community

    Credits: 3
    A comprehensive overview of community agencies and professionals who work with and support early learning programs and families. Students will learn and practice communication skills and strategies that enable them to connect with and encourage parents and other family members to be involved in their child’s growth and education. Special emphasis will be placed on intercultural communication.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 315 - Foundations of Infant/Toddler Development

    Credits: 5
    Provides an overview of knowledge and research in the area of infant/toddler development through a mental health lens. All domains of development will be studied, with a special focus on social/emotional development and the importance of responsive, respectful interactions. Students will explore research related to how infants “make meaning” and how this learning can be supported.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 340 - Equity and Social Justice in Early Care and Educ

    Credits: 3
    Equity and Social Justice examines attitudes and practices that are explicitly and/or subtly biased on the basis of race, gender, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, age, culture, disability, family/lifestyle, sexual identity and gender orientation. Students will explore historical and current issues of how systemic power, privilege, and oppression impact early childhood education systems and the individuals within those systems.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 350 - Theories, Relationships and Attachment

    Credits: 5
    Theories related to attachment and relationships will be studied and analyzed, providing a solid foundation for informed caregiving. Students will study attachment theorists, their ideas, and their continuing impact on early learning. They will also examine how early relationships have a significant impact on the social emotional development of the young child, and how brain development is influenced by these early relationships.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 370 - Curric & Environ Design Supports Social/Emotional Learnin

    Credits: 5
    A study of the importance of the environment as an integral support for Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) focused on children from birth to three. Provides valuable insights into how to design environments, plan curriculum, assess learning, and work with families. Environments and curriculum will be addressed regarding space, aesthetics, furnishings, materials, age groupings, human interactions, adult-child ratios and safety.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 401 - Reflective Consultation with Field Experience 1

    Credits: 2
    Students will work a minimum of 20 hours per week with children and families in an early childhood setting. Through regular group meetings, students will have the opportunity to engage in reflective consultation with faculty facilitation around their field experience. Students will go beyond just reflecting on simple application and knowledge, and will begin to integrate ideas and concepts into their work.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education; and ECED 301  ,  302  and 303 ; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 402 - Reflective Consultation with Field Experience 2

    Credits: 2
    Students will work a minimum of 20 hours per week with children and families in an early childhood setting. Through regular group meetings, students will have the opportunity to engage in reflective consultation with faculty facilitation around their field experience. Students will go beyond just reflecting on simple application and knowledge, and will begin to integrate ideas and concepts into their work.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education; and ECED 301 , 302  303  and 401  ; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 405 - Trauma Exposed and Vulnerable Families/Child

    Credits: 5
    An examination of the concept of trauma-informed care: an understanding of how trauma changes the brain and affects relationships, self-regulation, sensory processing, learning, and behavior. Students will learn to recognize the behavioral signs of trauma, and how to respond in ways that maintain respect and bring healing for young children and families.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 410 - Foundations of Challenging Behavior: Emotional

    Credits: 3
    An analysis of how aspects of child development and early learning potentially affect children’s behavior, including the relationship between trauma, brain development, and emotional dysregulation. Emphasis will be placed on nurturing respectful relationships in an inclusive social climate between teachers and young children as the essential basis for prevention and intervention.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 415 - Early Identification and Intervention: Children

    Credits: 5
    Through the use of a biopsychosocial framework, programs of assessment and intervention for children with developmental delays and mental health issues will be studied. Emphasis on interactive disorders, regulatory-sensory processing disorders and neurodevelopmental disorders. A review of historical and legal precedence for providing early intervention and early childhood special education services, and practical and effective techniques for working with this population

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 420 - Assessment Tools and Documentation

    Credits: 3
    Students will learn why observation, assessment, and documentation are essential elements of reflective practice. They will study and analyze various assessment tools used to document a child’s development and early learning experiences. Observations of children while using these tools will provide students the skills necessary for assessing the needs of each child, taking into account individual and cultural differences.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 425 - Leadership and Advocacy in Early Childhood Educ

    Credits: 3
    Students will implement ethical guidelines and other professional standards, learn techniques for collaboration, demonstrate reflective practice, make informed decisions, act as effective advocates for sound educational practices and policies, and conduct themselves as members of the early childhood profession.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 445 - Reflective Seminar

    Credits: 2
    Through small-group seminars and individual meetings with core faculty, students will reflect on their coursework and the experiences they have had in the Infant/Child Mental Health BAS Degree, and how this program has impacted their life, both personally and professionally.

    Prerequisite: Admission into BAS in Early Childhood Education; and ECED 301 , 302 , 303 401  and 402 ; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECED 450 - Capstone Project

    Credits: 5
    The final capstone course provides students an opportunity to synthesize and demonstrate their learning across the program, bringing together research, theory and application. Students will demonstrate overall degree competencies and show how research informs their professional work in the field of early learning. Students, in consultation with their program adviser will create a final culminating project to be presented to classmates and program faculty.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.

Economics

  
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    ECON 100 - Economic Principles and Applications

    Credits: 5
    General survey course stressing basic principles of economic analysis and their applications to current problems and social issues. Intended primarily for students not majoring in business or economics and not intending to take ECON 200.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    ECON 101 - Economics of Competition

    Credits: 5
    Study of scarcity, competition, costs, prices, and profits with specific attention to resources, unions, business and government.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    ECON 194 - Special Topics-Economics

    Credits: 1-5
    Focuses on a special topic such as inflation, unemployment, population growth, environmental pollution, energy, taxation, discrimination, poverty, crime, health care, or energy. Occasionally, a single course may cover several of these topics. Consists of lectures, class and small group discussions, and student presentations. Students use economic concepts in course presentations.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECON& 201 - Micro Economics

    Credits: 5
    Continues the analysis of problems involving scarcity, choice, competition, and cost. Examines the basic principles and models of microeconomics and their application to contemporary issues and problems. Primarily for students who are taking additional courses requiring a working knowledge of microeconomic theory.

    Prerequisite: ECON& 202  and eligible for ENGL& 101 ; or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    ECON& 202 - Macro Economics

    Credits: 5
    Introduces economic reasoning. Covers basic economic questions concerning economizing, competition and exchange. Also covers macroeconomics and questions relating to the determination of national income, output, employment and the price level.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  and MATH 147 ; or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    ECON 298 - Independent Study-Economics 1

    Credits: 5
    Enables students individually to pursue special interests or opportunities in economics under guidance of an instructor.

    Prerequisite: At least one 200-level course in ECON and instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECON 299 - Independent Study-Economics 2

    Credits: 5
    Enables students individually to pursue special interests or opportunities in economics under guidance of an instructor.

    Prerequisite: At least one 200-level course in ECON and instructor’s permission.

Education

  
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    EDUC& 115 - Child Development

    Credits: 5
    Provides study of developmental tasks and characteristics of infants and children. Course uses current research that includes the influence of culture on development, as well as other environmental influences. Includes observation techniques.

  
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    EDUC& 130 - Guiding Behavior

    Credits: 3
    Explores the positive guidance and discipline techniques that are developmentally appropriate and culturally sensitive. Discusses theories and styles of discipline with an emphasis on building positive self-esteem in children.

  
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    EDUC& 150 - Child, Family and Community Relationship

    Credits: 3
    Studies the relationship between parents and ECE workers and the impact this relationship has on professionalism. Emphasizes the communication skills and attitudes that allow the ECE worker to develop mutually respectful relationships with parents, co-workers and community.

  
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    EDUC 191 - The Role of the Paraeducator

    Credits: 3
    Based on the Washington state Paraeducator standards, this course introduces students to the training needed to work as effective members of an instructional team in the P-12 system. Provides an understanding of direct services to children and youth, including youth with disabilities. Introduces the student to the roles, responsibilities, and techniques of certificated/licensed staff and paraeducators.

  
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    EDUC 194 - Education Special Topics 1

    Credits: 1-5
    Enables students to pursue areas of special interest in the field of education. Students participate in approved, regularly scheduled workshops, seminars, or classes sponsored by the college or by a recognized institution or organization, e.g., Child Care Resources, Educational Service District, the Washington Association for the Education for Young Children or local affiliate, health department, articulating school districts, or childcare agency.

  
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    EDUC 195 - Education Special Topics 2

    Credits: 1-5
    Enables students to pursue areas of special interest in the field of education. Students participate in approved, regularly scheduled workshops, seminars, or classes sponsored by the college or by a recognized institution or organization, e.g., Child Care Resources, Educational Service District, the Washington Association for the Education for Young Children or local affiliate, health department, articulating school districts, or childcare agency.

  
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    EDUC 196 - Education Special Topics 3

    Credits: 1-5
    Enables students to pursue areas of special interest in the field of education. Students participate in approved, regularly scheduled workshops, seminars, or classes sponsored by the college or by a recognized institution or organization, e.g., Child Care Resources, Educational Service District, the Washington Association for the Education for Young Children or local affiliate, health department, articulating school districts, or childcare agency.

  
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    EDUC& 204 - Exceptional Child

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the characteristics and educational needs of exceptional children. Discusses autism, learning disabilities, communication disorders, ADD, developmental disabilities, vision and hearing impairments, and orthopedic/health impairments. Presents history, theory, and current research. Appropriate for those working with children ages birth through adolescence.

  
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    EDUC& 205 - Introduction to Education with Field Experience

    Credits: 5
    Acquaints students with the kindergarten through college American education system and the profession of teaching. Appropriate for those wishing to gain a better understanding of schools and teaching, especially those planning to enter the teaching profession. Includes a historical perspective of American education, current research on effective teaching strategies, and a discussion of current issues related to schools, teaching and learning. Also includes 33 hours of a required, supervised placement in an elementary, middle or high school or documentation of previous experience totaling 33 hours.

  
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    EDUC 210 - Assisting Practicum

    Credits: 3-6
    Students work with children in the classroom, learning and demonstrating the fundamentals of developmentally- appropriate and culturally-sensitive practices. Students participate online each week, linking the practicum experience to theory.

    Satisfies Requirement: Activity
  
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    EDUC 240 - Multicultural/Anti-Bias Issues in Education

    Credits: 3-5
    Examines attitudes and practices that are explicitly and/or subtly biased on the basis of race, gender, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, age, culture, disability, and family/life-style. Emphasizes the implications for classroom practices and developing a plan for incorporating anti-bias attitudes and practices into an educational setting.

  
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    EDUC 245 - Challenging Behaviors in Young Children

    Credits: 2
    Presents the basic facts and skills needed to understand and address challenging behaviors and to teach appropriate alternatives. Presents techniques and information drawn from neuroscience, psychology, psychiatry, special education, early care and education, child development, cross-cultural research, and proactive skills programs. Discusses the risk factors, protective factors, and the role of the brain in challenging behavior.

  
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    EDUC 270 - Teacher Portfolio Review

    Credits: 2
    Provides an independent study follow up course to EDUC& 205 . Elementary and secondary education students continue to document their participation in activities related to teacher education and Green River’s campus wide learning outcomes. These experiences are documented in a portfolio.

    Prerequisite: EDUC&205  and 60 or more credits.
  
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    EDUC 293 - Issues of Child Abuse

    Credits: 2
    Presents an overview of child abuse and neglect in the U.S. Covers basic definitions, theories of causes, and indicators of abuse. Discusses mandatory reporting laws and forms of intervention along with the importance of taking cultural factors into consideration. Recommended for individuals who work in child care settings and schools.

  
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    EDUC 294 - Education Special Topics 4

    Credits: 1-5
    Provides students with a basic knowledge to pursue areas of special interest in the field of education. Students participate in approved, regularly scheduled workshops and seminars sponsored by the college or by a recognized institution or organization, e.g., Educational Service District, the Washington Association for the Education of Young Children or local affiliate; health department, or childcare agency.

  
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    EDUC 295 - Education Special Topics 5

    Credits: 1-5
    Provides students with a basic knowledge to pursue areas of special interest in the field of education. Students participate in approved, regularly scheduled workshops and seminars sponsored by the college or by a recognized institution or organization, e.g., Educational Service District, the Washington Association for the Education of Young Children or local affiliate; health department, or childcare agency.

  
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    EDUC 296 - Education Special Topics 6

    Credits: 1-5
    Provides students with a basic knowledge to pursue areas of special interest in the field of education. Students participate in approved, regularly scheduled workshops and seminars sponsored by the college or by a recognized institution or organization, e.g., Educational Service District, the Washington Association for the Education of Young Children or local affiliate; health department, or childcare agency.


Emergency Medical Technician

  
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    EMT 101 - Emergency Medical Technician

    Credits: 12
    Teaches students the roles and responsibilities of the Emergency Medical Technician according to state and King county standards and requirements. Students develop skills in patient evaluation and other emergency medical procedures. Graduates of this program are eligible to take the National Registry Exam to qualify for state certification after meeting the Washington state requirement of employment.


Engineering

  
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    ENGR 100 - Careers in Engineering

    Credits: 2
    Explores the functions of engineering and computer science, branches of the professions, educational requirements, and transfer institutions offering these programs. Includes an introduction to the competencies required for programming, problem solving, engineering design, and the planning of a program of study necessary to receive a Bachelor of Science degree in engineering or computer science.

  
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    ENGR& 104 - Introduction to Design

    Credits: 5
    Introduces design and communication principles using an engineering project approach. Stresses teamwork, design process, creative and analytical thinking, quantitative analysis, professionalism and ethics, social, economic and political context, and open-ended problems. Introduces the engineering design process by building group skills, understanding the effects of different learning styles, producing strategies for innovation, and fostering creativity in problem solving. Includes design projects, journal keeping, professionalism and ethical issues, and oral presentations.

    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    ENGR 106 - Introduction to Engineering Problems

    Credits: 3
    Introduces dimensional analysis and vector algebra and their use in solving engineering problems. Uses Newton’s laws in problems involving forces, moments, acceleration and velocities. Discusses problem format, significant figures, statistics and error analysis, and their role in the design process.

    Prerequisite: MATH& 142  or equivalent.
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    ENGR& 114 - Engineering Graphics

    Credits: 5
    A beginning lab course focusing on visualization, sketching, and 3-D parametric modeling computer aided drafting (CAD). Introduces the basic design competencies and graphical solutions of spatial problems using basic engineering drawing principles. Provides skills in graphic communication and visualization of 3-D objects, as well as design and problem solving skills. Recommended for all beginning engineering students.

  
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    ENGR 120 - Introduction to Programming

    Credits: 2
    Introduces fundamental concepts of computer science and computational thinking. Includes introduction to logical reasoning, procedural decomposition, problem solving, and abstraction. Sets the context for further study in numerical methods and computer science programming languages. Cross-listed with CS 120 .

    Prerequisite: MATH& 142  or higher or concurrent enrollment; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGR 140 - Engineering Materials

    Credits: 5
    Investigates the basic principles relating to the structure and properties of materials used by practicing engineers. Provides discussion of the properties of organic and inorganic materials as related to their atomic, molecular, and crystalline structure.

    Prerequisite: CHEM& 161  or concurrent enrollment.
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    ENGR 177 - Engineering Work Experience 1

    Credits: 1-12
    Allows students to work full- or part-time in jobs directly related to their programs and interests. Students may receive a salary or volunteer.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in COOP 171  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGR 178 - Engineering Work Experience 2

    Credits: 1-12
    Allows students to work full- or part-time in jobs directly related to their programs and interests. Students may receive a salary or volunteer.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in COOP 171  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGR 179 - Engineering Work Experience 3

    Credits: 1-12
    Allows students to work full- or part-time in jobs directly related to their programs and interests. Students may receive a salary or volunteer.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in COOP 171  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGR 198 - Independent Study-Computer Programming 1

    Credits: 1-5
    Encourages students to study independently and develop their special interest in computer programming.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGR 199 - Independent Study-Computer Programming 2

    Credits: 1-5
    Students design, build and test a special project. With the approval of an engineering instructor, students select the project. Course permits students to explore a field of special interests under the guidance of an instructor.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGR& 204 - Electrical Circuits

    Credits: 5
    Introduces basic electrical circuits and systems. Topics include basic analysis techniques, nodal and mesh analysis, and Thevenin and Norton equivalent circuits. Applies linear differential equations to basic circuits. Concurrent enrollment in MATH 238  is desirable.

    Prerequisite: MATH& 153  and PHYS& 222 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    ENGR& 214 - Statics

    Credits: 5
    A fundamental course in the mechanics of rigid bodies in static equilibrium conditions. Solves practical engineering problems involving the loads carried by structural components using Static principles, vector notation and calculus for mathematical modeling. Teaches principles and their limitations within the context of engineering applications and the engineering design process.

    Prerequisite: ENGR 106  and MATH& 152 ; or concurrent enrollment.
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    ENGR& 215 - Dynamics

    Credits: 5
    An in-depth treatment of the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies using vector analysis. Topics include kinematics, kinetics, momentum, and energy principles for both particles and rigid bodies. A required course for numerous engineering programs.

    Prerequisite: ENGR& 214 , MATH& 152  and PHYS& 221 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    ENGR& 224 - Thermodynamics

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the basic principles of thermodynamics. Covers energy transformations, work and heat, ideal and real gases, first and second laws of thermodynamics, and applications to engineering systems.

    Prerequisite: CHEM& 161  and MATH& 152  , or PHYS& 221 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    ENGR& 225 - Mechanics of Materials

    Credits: 5
    A rigorous investigation of the concepts of stress and deformation in structural members. Focuses on the development of basic relationships between loads, stress, and deformation in members such as beams, columns, shafts, and tension members.

    Prerequisite: ENGR& 214 ; and MATH& 153  or concurrent enrollment.
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    ENGR 250 - Numerical Methods Using MATLAB

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the use of computers and the MATLAB program to solve engineering problems using applied numerical method. Students learn how to implement important and fundamental numerical methods, with applications from a variety of courses, including the engineering mechanics sequence (ENGR& 214 , ENGR& 225  and ENGR& 215 ), ENGR& 224 - Thermodynamics , and Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering (ENGR& 204 ).

    Prerequisite: MATH& 254  and one of the following: CS 120 /ENGR 120  or CS& 131  or CS& 141 .

English

  
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    ENGL 080 - English Express

    Credits: 2
    An academic support class designed to help develop students with their reading and writing skills in ENGL 081 /READ 094 . Class may utilize support services.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 081  and READ 094 , a learning community class.
  
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    ENGL 081 - Fundamentals of Written Communication

    Credits: 5
    A writing course that focuses on the skills designed to prepare students for ENGL 099  or professional/technical degrees. Introduces students to the writing process so they can write well-organized and developed paragraphs and short essays. Students study grammar, basic sentence structure, mechanics, punctuation, and improve vocabulary and spelling. Students also read works that include various rhetorical structures and themes in order to improve critical reading and writing skills.

    Prerequisite: BASIC 060  or appropriate Reading placement score. Note: Some students from certain school districts are eligible for the transcript placement option.
  
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    ENGL 090 - Spelling Improvement

    Credits: 3
    For students who want to increase their proficiency in spelling. Students learn to apply basic spelling rules to sound out words that are spelled phonetically, and to memorize commonly misspelled words that are not spelled entirely by sound. Includes lecture, discussion, class exercises, homework review, and testing in each concept-based unit.

  
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    ENGL 091 - Vocabulary Improvement

    Credits: 3-5
    Offers students the opportunity to improve their vocabularies. Lectures and discussions introduce basic techniques and guidelines for vocabulary development.

  
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    ENGL 092 - Composition Skills: Mechanics and Paragraphs

    Credits: 1-2
    An individualized course for improvement of skills in composition. Students work to improve punctuation, sentence structure, paragraph writing, short essay construction or other fundamental composition techniques. Students strengthen writing skills by reading examples of good writing as illustrated in published essays. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 081 .
  
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    ENGL 097 - English Express: Integrating Reading and Writing

    Credits: 10
    An accelerated course that enables students to more rapidly progress to college English. Focuses on integrated reading and writing and takes a process approach to issues central to college literacy and writing including information literacy, critical thinking, summary, analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Students will also learn college success strategies such as goal setting, academic and career planning, college resource utilization, financial literacy, time management, and persistence strategies.

    Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score.
  
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    ENGL 098 - Bridge to College English

    Credits: 5
    A skill building class to help students move from ENGL 081  and READ 094  to college-level English skills classes. Students learn to use basic skills to improve reading skills in vocabulary, fluency and comprehension and to improve writing skills in sentence, paragraph and essay construction.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 081  or 100 or READ 094  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGL 099 - Introductory Composition

    Credits: 5
    Intensive writing course designed to prepare students for ENGL& 101 . Focuses on college-level composition skills (composition and revision processes) and college-level reading analysis. Presents a general review of the rules of English grammar and spelling.

    Prerequisite: (READ 094  and ENGL 081 ) or ENGL 097 , all with a grade of 2.0 or higher; or appropriate English/reading placement; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGL& 101 - English Composition I

    Credits: 5
    A composition course designed to teach critical reading and clear, purposeful, and effective writing. Writing tasks are related to course readings and prepare students for writing assignments in other college classes.

    Prerequisite: READ 104  and ENGL 099 , with a grade of 2.0 or higher; or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 117 ; or appropriate English/reading placement score.
    Satisfies Requirement: Basic Skills/Communication
  
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    ENGL 103 - Composition Skills: College Writing

    Credits: 1-3
    An individualized course for improvement of skills relating to drafting, revising and presenting focused writing assignments including essays, reports, and other academic writing assignments. Students may also strengthen writing skills by reading examples of good writing as illustrated in published essays. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 .
  
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    ENGL 105 - Grammar and Usage

    Credits: 5
    Teaches the structure of sentences through analysis of the five basic patterns and their alterations. Principles of usage and punctuation are presented as they relate to the structure of the sentence. Students may take this course to improve their grammar and usage and their editing skills.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 097  or 099 ; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGL 106 - Vocabulary Mastery

    Credits: 5
    For transfer and pre-professional students who wish to increase their vocabularies and develop more effective vocabulary skills. Emphasizes increasing knowledge of vocabulary to enhance reading, writing, and speaking.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 091 , eligible for READ 104 , or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGL 107 - Elements of Composition

    Credits: 1
    Offers instruction in discrete elements of effective academic writing, such as punctuation usage, sentence-level clarity, essay structure, documentation and source composition as determined by programmatic need or demand.

  
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    ENGL 108 - Medical Terminology

    Credits: 1-2
    Emphasizes vocabulary skills using medical terminology and phrases. Students learn to read, pronounce and spell medical terms correctly. Recognize and understand the meaning of medical terms through learning roots, prefixes and suffixes, and word-building systems. Designed primarily for Health Occupations and Court Reporting program majors; however, course is useful for anyone desiring a background in the language of medicine.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 090 , spelling pretest score of 80 percent, or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGL 109 - Writing for Trades and Career/Technical Degrees

    Credits: 5
    Teaches critical reading and clear, effective, practical college writing. Readings are keyed to career/technical topics. Writing assignments reflect actual work products, including letters, memoranda, surveys, reports, evaluations, and proposals.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 081 , or eligible for READ 104 , or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGL& 112 - Introduction to Fiction

    Credits: 5
    Increases understanding and appreciation of fiction through intensive reading and analysis of short stories.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    ENGL& 113 - Introduction to Poetry

    Credits: 5
    Increases understanding and appreciation of poetry through a study of poetic techniques and through extensive readings in various poetic forms by selected poets.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    ENGL& 114 - Introduction to Drama

    Credits: 5
    Increases understanding and appreciation of drama through extensive reading and analysis. Readings include, but not limited to, plays from Greek theater, plays from the Renaissance, and plays from modern playwrights.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    ENGL 115 - Introduction to Novels

    Credits: 5
    Study of various novels with emphasis on how to read, enjoy and understand the works. Includes selected works of significant English, European, and American novelists from Cervantes to the present.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    ENGL 117 - Accelerated Support for ENGL& 101 Success

    Credits: 3
    A fully integrated support course for ENGL& 101  for accelerated and traditional students. Helps students succeed in ENGL& 101  by providing additional coaching in critical thinking skills; time management and study skills; active, critical and cross-disciplinary reading techniques; enhanced writing instruction, and an integration of on-campus resources for additional support.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL& 101 ; ENGL 097  with a grade of 2.0 or higher; Reading placement score; or high school transcript evaluation; or ENGL 080  with a grade of 2.0 or higher; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENGL 126 - Writing: Humanities

    Credits: 5
    A composition course with readings designed to teach research-based writing in the disciplines of the humanities. Continues to develop the reading and writing skills taught in ENGL& 101 , but emphasizes the development of academic research and writing skills. Students engage in critical thinking throughout the course, which includes analysis, interpretation, and evaluation of humanities texts and the documentation and synthesis of multiple sources and evidence.

    Prerequisite: A grade of 2.0 in ENGL& 101 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Basic Skills/Communication
  
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    ENGL 127 - Writing: Social Science

    Credits: 5
    A composition course with readings designed to teach research-based writing in the social sciences. Continues to develop the basic reading and writing skills taught in ENGL& 101 , but emphasizes the development of academic research and writing skills. Students engage in critical thinking, which includes the analysis, interpretation, evaluation, documentation, and synthesis of multiple sources and evidence.

    Prerequisite: A grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL&101 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Basic Skills/Communication
  
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    ENGL 128 - Research Writing: Science/Engineering/Business

    Credits: 5
    A composition course with readings designed to teach research-based writing in the sciences, engineering and business. Continues to develop the basic reading and writing skills taught in ENGL& 101 , but emphasizes the development of academic research and writing skills. Students engage in critical thinking which includes the analysis, interpretation, evaluation, documentation, and synthesis of multiple sources and evidence.

    Prerequisite: A grade of 2.0 or higher in ENGL&101 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Basic Skills/Communication
  
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    ENGL 160 - Literature By and About Women

    Credits: 5
    Introduces writings by and about women. Studies cultural/historical concepts and paradigms that have impacted women’s concepts of them, of their relationships to men, and of their relationships to the general cultures that surround them. Introduces students to writers from various literary periods and from various nations and cultures.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English and Diversity
  
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    ENGL 161 - Cultures of Desire

    Credits: 5
    Examines literary and cultural representations of desire-including love, the erotic, sexuality, the body, the spirit, and community-across various traditions, historical periods, and locations. Literal text may be studied comparatively with mythologies, religions, scientific discourses, the arts, popular culture, and/or cyberspace. Critical questions include language, identity, hegemony, diversity, and/or freedom, among others.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English and Diversity
  
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    ENGL 162 - LGBTQ Literature

    Credits: 5
    An examination of stories, poems, and work of other genres addressing lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) identities. Applying lenses of culture, race, nationality, religion, and history, the course examines LGBTQ literature’s interactions with cultural and historical constructions of sexuality and gender. Coursework includes critical/cultural theory, writing, and research.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 . Satisfies a humanities/fine arts/English and the diversity course requirement.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English and Diversity
 

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