Nov 27, 2020  
2017-2019 Catalog Addendum 
    
2017-2019 Catalog Addendum [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This section includes a brief description of each credit class offered on a regular basis at Green River College. Classes are arranged in alphabetical order according to the college department that offers the class.

Each listing includes a course number (prefix & code/number), course title, number of credits awarded, prerequisite and academic transfer distributions are also designated where applicable. Common course numbers are identified by an “&” symbol at the end of the department abbreviation.

Course numbers 100-299 are designated for Green River College programs and courses that transfer to senior institutions (transfer is sometimes limited). The 100 series is ordinarily for first-year students and the 200 series for second-year students, but this distinct varies because of differing requirements at other colleges and universities. The 300 and 400 level series are for third- and fourth-year students.

Consult the “Programs of Study ” section of this catalog and your faculty advisor for specific information about each class and about which classes will meet your requirements.

 

Nursing

  
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    NURSE 104 - Fundamentals of Health

    Credits: 6
    Learn concepts and theories relating to the basic art and science of nursing to meet the needs of individuals across the lifespan in an ethical, legal and safe manner, utilizing the nursing process. The role of the nurse within the health care team is highlighted throughout. Topics include client needs, safety, communication, critical thinking, patient education, ethical and legal considerations, cultural diversity and the history of nursing.

    Prerequisite: Completion of pre-admission requirements.
  
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    NURSE 105 - Fundamentals of Health Community Lab

    Credits: 4
    Taken concurrently with NURSE 104 , this laboratory experience in both long term and acute care settings provides students basic nursing skills, including patient/client assessment, basic hygiene and assistance with activities of daily living.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in NURSE 104  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 106 - Med-Surg I

    Credits: 5
    Provides an overview of the care and management of clients with urinary, cancer, respiratory, fluid and electrolyte, acid-base, and integumentary disorders. Etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, medical management, nutrition, and geriatric implications are studied. Principles of pharmacology, medication administration, diagnostic testing, patient safety, and nursing process will be integrated to assist the client’s return to health and function.

    Prerequisite: NURSE 104  and NURSE 105  and concurrent enrollment in NURSE 107 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 107 - Med-Surg I Community Lab

    Credits: 8
    Builds upon the Foundations of Health Lab and strengthens student knowledge of patient care skills across lifespan and their application in clinical. Utilize critical thinking in the nursing process, demonstrate culturally appropriate care, documentation, communicate with clients/families, care team in different settings. Campus simulation provides the opportunity to further develop clinical reasoning applicable to practice. Admission, discharge and transfer included.

    Prerequisite: NURSE 105  and concurrent enrollment in NURSE 106 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 109 - Med-Surg II Community Lab

    Credits: 8
    Course builds upon Med-Surg I Lab to strengthen knowledge of patient care skills across lifespan, and application in clinical. Utilize critical thinking with the nursing process, demonstrate culturally sensitive care, document, and communicate with clients/families and care team. On campus simulation provide the opportunity to safely refine clinical reasoning to clinical practice.

    Prerequisite: NURSE 105  and NURSE 106 ; and concurrent enrollment in NURSE 110 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 110 - Med-Surg II

    Credits: 8
    Overview of care and management of clients with cardiovascular/peripheral-vascular, neurologic, orthopedic, endocrine, gastrointestinal, and eye/ear disorders. Etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, management, nutrition, and geriatric implications are studied. Principles of pharmacology, medication administration, diagnostic testing, patient safety and nursing process are integrated. Client/family with abuse/neglect, death/dying also included. NCLEX preparation and pre-employment discussed.

    Prerequisite: Enrollment in the Practical Nursing Program; and NURSE 106 ; and concurrent enrollment in NURSE 109 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 111 - Mental Health in Nursing

    Credits: 3
    Focuses on principles underlying the care of a client with mental health disorders and the importance of a therapeutic relationship and environment. Psychopathology and treatment modalities regarding nursing care of the client with mental disorders are reviewed. Role of the nurse using the nursing process with the healthcare team is discussed with multiple psychological and psychosocial problems.

    Prerequisite: NURSE 104  and 105 ; and concurrent enrollment in NURSE 107 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 112 - Reproductive/OB/Pediatric Nursing

    Credits: 4
    Overview of the basic principles of caring for childbearing and childrearing family and pediatric client. Builds on mastered medical-surgical content with application to pediatric, reproductive and obstetric populations. Utilizes nursing process to provide care to family across lifespan. Topics include human growth and development, health promotion, disease prevention and medical management of pediatric, reproductive and obstetric clients.

    Prerequisite: NURSE 109  and NURSE 110 ; and concurrent enrollment NURSE 113 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 113 - Advanced Community Lab

    Credits: 7
    Provides opportunities for advanced application of the nursing process when caring for clients across the life span. Gain knowledge of the obstetric client/newborn, code/emergency management. Utilize critical thinking and demonstrate cultural sensitivity. Simulation provides students the opportunity to refine clinical reasoning skills. Perform dosage calculations and complete a nursing care plan.

    Prerequisite: NURSE 109  and NURSE 110 ; and concurrent enrollment in NURSE 112 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 114 - Intravenous Therapy

    Credits: 2
    Presents all the core skills needed for the novice nursing student to become familiar with intravenous therapy. Instruction includes review of Legal considerations, Fluid, Electrolyte, and Acid-Base Balance, Fluid Administration, Blood Products, Total Parenteral Nutrition, and IV Medication Administration. Students completing the course will be eligible for IV certification.

    Prerequisite: NURSE 105  and 106 ; and concurrent enrollment in NURSE 109 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 116 - Nursing Issues and Delivery Systems

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the concepts and skills to assist the nurse to remain flexible in the ever-changing nursing care scene. Provides a brief historical overview of nursing practice and identifies trends and nursing issues of the future.

    Prerequisite: NURSE 104 .
  
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    NURSE 122 - Health Professionals CPR with AED

    Credits: 1
    Provides the nurse assistant and practical nurse students with the basic knowledge and skills for CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) for the health care professional, including the use of the AED (automated external defibrillator). Follows the American Heart Association protocols.

    Prerequisite: Enrollment in Practical Nursing or Nurse Assistant program.
  
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    NURSE 123 - Emergency Care & Disaster Preparedness

    Credits: 1
    Introduces the student nurse to the provision of care in an emergency setting for clients across the life-span. The concepts of assessment of the client experiencing an emergency and the initial prioritizing of care will be explored. Cardiac and pulmonary emergencies will be discussed including the roles and responsibilities of healthcare team members responding to the emergency.

    Prerequisite: NURSE 109  and 110 ; and concurrent enrollment in NURSE 112 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 127 - AIDS/CPR Safety/Inspection Control

    Credits: 2
    Provides education and training in infant, child, and adult cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), automated external defibrillation (AED), and bag-mask valve techniques for individuals who are responsible for delivering emergency care. Taught according to American Heart Association guidelines for Health Care Providers. An American Heart Association Health Care Provider card will be awarded upon successful completion of the course. Also provides education and training for health care providers of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) including: medical aspects, epidemiology, transmission, prevention, and treatment.

  
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    NURSE 194 - Special Studies-Nursing

    Credits: 1-6
    Enables students to pursue areas of special interest in the nursing field such as gerontology, adult critical care, pediatrics, and fetal monitoring.

  
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    NURSE 198 - Independent Study-Nursing

    Credits: 1-10
    Students are responsible to meet with a Nursing advisor and agree to a specific objective contract which identifies unit of credits, and learning experiences to be completed. This contract is filed with the Dean of Instruction, Health Sciences and Education.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 294 - Special Studies in Nursing 2

    Credits: 1-6
    Enables students to pursue areas of special interest in the nursing field such as neonatal intensive care, adult critical care, advanced pediatrics, and advanced fetal monitoring.


Nursing Assistant

  
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    NRS A 110 - Nurse Assistant Theory

    Credits: 6
    Students develop the concepts and knowledge necessary to provide entry level nurse assistant care.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    NRS A 111 - Nurse Assistant Community Lab

    Credits: 4
    Students apply knowledge and develop the physical skills necessary to provide entry level nurse assistant care.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in NRS A 110 .
  
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    NRS A 112 - Introduction to Nursing Care Studies

    Credits: 2
    Students develop the skills necessary to improve learning and retention of nursing care and studies. Includes skills of time management, study techniques, stress reduction, and critical thinking.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in NRS A 111 .

Nutrition

  
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    NUTR& 101 - Nutrition

    Credits: 5
    Introduction to the role of nutrition in human health. Topics include human metabolism, utilization of nutrients, nutritive value of foods, factors that affect eating habits, food advertising, nutrition and disease, and establishing a healthy lifestyle. This course is particularly suitable for health occupations students.

    Prerequisite: AP 100 , AP 103  or BIOL& 160 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science

Occupational Therapy Assistant

  
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    OTA 100 - Introduction to Occupational Therapy

    Credits: 3
    Introduces the practice of occupational therapy, its history and philosophical base. Covers occupational therapy practice framework such as domain and process, the occupational therapy process, and the promotion of health. Introduces ethics and professional behavior.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 101 - Life Span Growth and Development in Humans

    Credits: 3
    Includes a study of the basic theories and processes of normal human growth and development. Emphasizes practical assessment and integration of all components- psychosocial, physical and cognitive-relative to the needs of recipients of occupational therapy.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 102 - OTA Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology

    Credits: 3
    Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the function of the human body to include applied concepts related to anatomy, kinesiology, and biomechanics with an emphasis on material related to the practice of occupational therapy across diverse clientele and practice settings. Client factors, body functions and body structures related to movement are studied as they affect performance in areas of occupation.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 103 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 103 - Applied OT Applied Anatomy and Kinesiology Lab

    Credits: 2
    Application of concepts learned in OTA 102 . Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the function of the human body to include applied concepts related to anatomy, kinesiology, and biomechanics with an emphasis on material related to the practice of occupational therapy across diverse clientele and practice settings. Client factors, body functions and body structures related to movement are studied as they affect performance in areas of occupation.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 102 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 111 - Fundamentals of Occupational Therapy as Health Care Providers

    Credits: 2
    Students learn basic patient-therapist interaction and communication skills, introductory use of medical terminology, patient confidentiality and HIPPA rules, infection control and blood borne pathogens guidelines, and time management skills. Students earn HIV/AIDS certification.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 112 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 112 - Professional Skills for Healthcare Providers Lab

    Credits: 2
    Students demonstrate ability to apply strategies for learned communication with inter disciplinary team and patients with the use of proper medical terminology, and safe practice of infection control and blood borne pathogens guidelines. Implement strategies for time management and application of study skills. Demonstrates implementation of OT practice framework and introduction into task analyses.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 111 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 120 - Developmental Disabilities 1

    Credits: 3
    Students study the conditions that impede normal growth and development with special emphasis on cerebral palsy, mental retardation, ADHD/ADD, autism spectrum disorder, childhood genetic disorders, and learning disabilities. Explores developmentally appropriate occupational therapy treatment methods with opportunity for experiential learning of patient handling techniques. Emphasis is placed on the role of the OTA in different pediatric settings and the influence of legislation changes and laws that have influenced OT practice.

    Prerequisite: OTA 102  and OTA 103 ; concurrent enrollment in OTA 121 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 121 - Developmental Disabilities 1 Lab

    Credits: 2
    Lab allows for practical experience in patient screening tools, standardized assessment, and activity treatment interventions as it relates to developmental disabilities.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 120 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 122 - Physical Disabilities 1

    Credits: 3
    Study of the effects of heritable diseases, genetic conditions, disability, trauma and injury to the physical and mental health and occupational performance of the individual. Study the structure and function of the human body to include the biological and physical foundation of specific clinical conditions. Includes basic assessment and treatment approaches utilized in occupational therapy intervention of the physically disabled.

    Prerequisite: OTA 102  and OTA 103 ; concurrent enrollment in OTA 123 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 123 - Physical Disabilities 1 Lab

    Credits: 2
    Basic assessment and treatment techniques as it relates to adult physical disabilities. Lab allows for practical experience in patient assessment, transfers and daily living skills.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 122 ; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 126 - Clinical Seminar 1

    Credits: 1
    Teaches students the basics of client-therapist interaction, documentation, clinical issues, and therapeutic techniques. Includes weekly discussion of concurrent clinical experiences.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 127  and OTA 128 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 127 - Clinical Seminar Lab

    Credits: 1
    Students demonstrate skills at a novice level to gather necessary information to implement evaluation, treatment, and occupational profile of the client, document occupational therapy service, implement treatment based on the OTPF. Students also demonstrate professional behaviors required to be successful in the fieldwork.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 126  and OTA 128 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 128 - Application of Occupational Therapy Assistant 1

    Credits: 1
    Students participate in supervised clinical experience with clients in a community health care facility. Includes observation, planning and implementation of client treatments as assigned by clinical supervisor, and application of theory and treatment techniques. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 126  and OTA 127 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 130 - Professional Advocacy Experience

    Credits: 1
    Acquaints students with therapy practitioner’s responsibilities in professional activities and for promotion of occupational therapy to other professionals, consumers, third-party payers and the public.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 131 - Physical Disabilities 2

    Credits: 3
    Understand the effects of heritable diseases, genetic conditions, disability, trauma, and injury to the physical and mental health and occupational performance of the individual. Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the structure and function of the human body to include the biological and physical sciences of specific clinical conditions. Describe and demonstrate basic assessment and treatment approaches utilized in occupational therapy intervention of the physically disabled through practical experiences in a lab setting.

    Prerequisite: OTA 102  and OTA 103 ; OTA 122  and OTA 123 ; Concurrent enrollment in OTA 132 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 132 - Physical Disabilities 2 Lab

    Credits: 2
    Basic assessment and treatment techniques as it relates to adult physical disabilities. Lab allows for practical experience in patient assessment, transfers, and daily living skills.

    Prerequisite: OTA 102  and OTA 103 ; OTA 122  and OTA 123 ; concurrent enrollment in OTA 131 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 133 - Psychosocial Dysfunction

    Credits: 3
    Students learn the techniques used to meet mental health needs within the occupational therapy setting. Includes the application of psychosocial frames of reference, clinical conditions, and the application of occupational therapy to these conditions.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 134 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 134 - Psychosocial Dysfunction Lab

    Credits: 1
    Students apply the techniques used to meet mental health needs within the occupational therapy setting including psychosocial frames of reference and clinical conditions using the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 133 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 194 - Special Topics-Occupational Therapy

    Credits: 1-2
    Intermediate level course that encourages students to study in a special area of occupational therapy. Students attend class on a regular basis to complete course project.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 198 - Independent Study - Occupational Therapy Assistant

    Credits: 1
    For students needing remediation for successful completion of fieldwork experiences, or who wish to explore specific areas of occupational therapy in-depth. Students participate in learning activities needed to re-mediate deficient areas. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 200 - Developmental Disabilities 2

    Credits: 1
    An advanced level course that expands students’ understanding of conditions that affect children. Focuses on introduction and discussion of task analysis, assistive technology and devices and occupational -based approaches.

    Prerequisite: OTA 120  and OTA 121 ; Concurrent enrollment in OTA 201 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 201 - Developmental Disabilities 2 Lab

    Credits: 2
    Students apply and demonstrate novice competency of material learned in OTA 200 . Focuses on application and hands on experience with task analysis, assistive technology and devices and occupational based approaches. Students demonstrate interventions and collaborate with clients, educators and other health care professionals using a service learning model.

    Prerequisite: OTA 120  and OTA 121 ; concurrent enrollment in OTA 200 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 202 - Ethics, Society, and Professional Practice

    Credits: 3
    Provides an overview and understanding of professional ethics and responsibilities including knowledge of ethical principles, professional development, healthcare reimbursement systems and healthcare laws. Also includes critical analysis of social issues including socioeconomics, social injustices, cultural awareness and diversity factors related to the practice of occupational therapy. Students learn through class lectures and discussions as well as practical assignments that promote critical thinking.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 210 - Therapeutic Practices in Occupational Therapy

    Credits: 3
    An advanced level course that incorporates the application of theories, models of practice, and frames of reference in the analysis, selection and use of activities in a therapeutic environment while addressing the needs of diverse patient populations. Emphasis is placed on the application of the OTA Practice Framework in the development of intervention targeting ADL and IADL. Includes instruction in the responsibilities a COTA has in the areas of documentation, record keeping, service operations, research, and safety and infection control.

    Prerequisite: OTA 122 ; OTA 123 ; OTA 131 ; OTA 132 ; OTA 133 ; and concurrent enrollment in OTA 211 .
  
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    OTA 211 - Therapeutic Practices Clinical Skills Training

    Credits: 2
    An advanced level course that emphasizes the application of therapeutic practices in a clinical context. Includes training and feedback in areas related to client care including chart review, intervention planning, intervention implementation, documentation and discharge planning.

    Prerequisite: OTA 122 ; OTA 123 ; OTA 131 ; OTA 132 ; OTA 133 ; concurrent enrollment in OTA 210 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 212 - Therapeutic Group Leadership

    Credits: 1
    Students study group dynamics as related to occupational therapy. Students learn to plan and implement activity groups appropriate to patients or clients of all ages. Emphasizes group leadership skills.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 213 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 213 - Therapeutic Group Leadership Lab

    Credits: 1
    Students implement activities, appropriate to clients of all ages, incorporating components of a group, characteristics of different type of groups, and developmental levels of a group.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 212 ; and instructor’s permission
  
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    OTA 220 - Therapeutic Activities 2

    Credits: 1
    Students learn to plan and implement socioculturally-appropriate therapeutic leisure and social activities for patients/clients in a variety of community settings. Emphasizes gradation and adaptation of leisure and social activities appropriate for a variety of patient/client diagnoses.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 221 - Therapeutic Group Activities 2 Lab

    Credits: 2
    Students implement and lead activities for clients of all ages, characteristics of different type of groups, and developmental levels of a group.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 220 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 222 - Clinical Seminar 2

    Credits: 1
    Students learn basics of patient-therapist interaction, documentation, clinical issues, and therapeutic techniques. Also includes weekly discussion of concurrent clinical experiences.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 223 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 223 - Application of OTA Co-op Experience 2

    Credits: 1
    Students participate in supervised clinical experience with patients in a community health care facility. Includes observation, planning and implementation of patient treatments as assigned by clinical supervisor. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 222 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 224 - Therapeutic Adaptations

    Credits: 5
    An advanced course where students demonstrate previously learned technical skills as well as their knowledge of physical dysfunctions as they work with a variety of material to design, modify, adapt and fabricate special equipment and assistive devices for the disabled. Students demonstrate and articulate the use of technology to support performance, participation, health and wellbeing.

    Prerequisite: OTA 200  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 225 - Application of Therapeutic Activities

    Credits: 3
    An advanced course where students will apply and integrate previously learned technical skills as well as knowledge of physical dysfunction as they work with a variety of materials to design, modify, adapt and fabricate special equipment and assistive devices for the disabled.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 224 .
  
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    OTA 228 - Pre-Fieldwork Experience Seminar

    Credits: 2
    Prepares student for successful completion of Level 2 fieldwork. Emphasizes further development of documentation skills. Additional topics include self-assessment in preparation for full-time fieldwork, job search skills, service operations, and supervision issues.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 240 - Fieldwork Experience Seminar 1

    Credits: 1
    Students discuss and problem-solve fieldwork experiences, read and discuss literature appropriate to fieldwork and review OTA program content in preparation for national certification exam.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 245 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 241 - Fieldwork Experience Seminar 2

    Credits: 1
    Students discuss and problem-solve fieldwork experiences, read and discuss literature appropriate to fieldwork, and review OTA program content in preparation for national certification exam.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 246 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 245 - Co-op Fieldwork Experience 1

    Credits: 11
    Fieldwork experience includes practice in one of the following areas: physical disabilities, psychological dysfunction, geriatrics, developmental disabilities, pediatrics, work hardening/pain management, or hand therapy under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapy practitioner. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in OTA 240 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    OTA 246 - Co-op Fieldwork Experience 2

    Credits: 11
    Fieldwork experience includes practice in one of the following areas: physical disabilities, psychological dysfunction, geriatrics, developmental disabilities, pediatrics, work hardening/pain management, or hand therapy under the supervision of a licensed occupational therapy practitioner. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: OTA 245 ; concurrent enrollment in OTA 241 ; and instructor’s permission.

Oceanography

  
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    OCEA& 101 - Introduction to Oceanography

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the fundamental principles of ocean science: the geology and geography of ocean basins; chemistry of sea water; physical dynamics of currents, waves, and tides; coastal processes; how human activity influences ocean environments; and the diverse ecosystems of Earth’s oceans such as deep sea vents, coral reefs, and estuaries.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science or Lab Science

Philosophy

  
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    PHIL& 101 - Introduction to Philosophy

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the major problems and figures of philosophy. Gives students a greater understanding of human experience through the examination of the concepts of reality, knowledge and value. Questions posed may include: Does God exists? Do we act freely? Is the mind distinct from the body? Can we ever know anything for certain? What really matters?

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 102 - Contemporary Moral Problems

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the most urgent moral problems of our day. Provides students with an introduction to ethical theories and their application to contemporary moral problems. Topics may include war and torture, capital punishment, animal rights and the environment, abortion, euthanasia, and liberty.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 103 - Historical Survey-Ancient Philosophy

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the ancient philosophy of western civilization. Examines the beginnings of philosophy from pre-Socratic ancient Greece up to the early Christian era, including such philosophers as Thales, Pythagoras, Heraclitus, Parmenides, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, and Epicurus. Emphasizes how past thinkers have influenced current thought and practice.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 104 - Historical Survey-Medieval Philosophy

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the medieval philosophy of western civilization. Looks at the period of philosophy from the early Christian era through the scholasticism of the medieval period, including such philosophers as St. Augustine, St. Anselm, Averroes, St. Thomas Aquinas, Duns Scotus and William of Ockham. Emphasizes how past thinkers have influenced current thought and practice.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 105 - Historical Survey-Modern Philosophy

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the philosophy of modern western civilization. Examines the period of philosophy from the humanism of the Enlightenment through the end of the 19th century, including such philosophers as Descartes, Leibniz, Spinoza, Hobbes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, and Kant. Emphasizes the influence of these philosophers on current thought and practice.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 108 - Historical Survey-Contemporary Philosophy

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to a survey of issues in philosophy from roughly the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. Key figures include Frege, Russell, Moore, Wittgenstein, Quine, Davidson, Kripke, and Putnam. Key topics include Logical Atomism, Logical Positivism, Ordinary Language Philosophy, Truth, Meaning, Reference, and Interpretation. May also discuss reactions to contemporary philosophy in the form of phenomenology, pragmatism, and existentialism.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 110 - Social and Political Philosophy

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the major themes of social and political philosophy, including justice, forms of government, revolution, liberty, equality, and civil disobedience. Sample topics include: What is a just distribution of income? What is the best form of government? Should there be limits to free speech? Is one ever justified in disobeying the law?

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 111 - Science, Technology and Value

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the social, environmental, and ethical implications of contemporary science and technology. Topics include the normative ethics of behavior, value theory, and metaphysics together with issues on artificial intelligence, internet privacy, climate change, biotechnology, gender, and everyday artifacts.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 112 - Ethics in the Workplace

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the ethical issues and problems (national and international) that arise in workplace, professional, and organizational settings. Helps students identify and solve these problems within the framework of ethical theory. May include topics such as negotiation, sexual harassment, comparable worth, whistle-blowing, and the rights and responsibilities of employers and employees.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 114 - Philosophical Issues in Law

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the philosophical issues that arise in law and legal reasoning. Sample topics include patterns of legal reasoning, crime and punishment, civil disobedience, affirmative action, freedom of speech, and legal paternalism. Readings may include material from actual legal cases, as well as from philosophical essays.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL& 115 - Critical Thinking

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to informal non-symbolic logic and critical thinking. Sample topics include language analysis, inductive reasoning, statistical analysis, causal reasoning, arguments from analogy and fallacious patterns of reasoning. Students examine arguments in real-life situations which allows for a more willing exchange of ideas through asking questions, constructing arguments, and engaging in reasoned discussion.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL& 120 - Symbolic Logic

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to modern symbolic logic, including both propositional logic translation and proofs and predicate logic translation and proofs. Topics may include recognizing arguments, translating from a natural to a formal language, validity of arguments, logical implication, equivalency, and consistency.

    Prerequisite: MATH 097  with a grade of 2.0 or higher; or eligible for MATH 107  or higher.
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science or, under certain conditions, the quantitative component of the basic skills requirement.
  
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    PHIL 160 - Introduction to the Philosophy of Science

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to a critical look at the methods of inquiry associated with the sciences. Drawing from a broad range of historical and contemporary sources, topics will include: the aim of science; distinguishing science from non-science; scientific explanation, confirmation, and falsification; and the structure of scientific revolutions. Other topics may be discussed.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 194 - Special Topics-Philosophy

    Credits: 3-5
    Allows students to pursue a philosophical topic that is not part of the regular curriculum. Course content varies depending on requests from students or the opportunity to present special topics.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    PHIL 199 - Independent Study-Philosophy 1

    Credits: 1-5
    Allows students to independently study a topic of their special interest in philosophy. Students meet on a tutorial basis with a philosophy instructor. Credits, topics, and assignments vary according to student-faculty agreement.

    Prerequisite: Two courses in Philosophy, a topic that some member of the department is qualified to direct and evaluate, and permission from the division chair and instructor. Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    PHIL 200 - Introduction to the Philosophy of Religion

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the philosophy of religion, exploring such issues as the existence of God, faith and reason, the problem of evil, and the possibility of immortality.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 206 - Gender and Philosophy

    Credits: 5
    Examines how issues of gender have entered into discussions within the major fields of philosophy, including ethics, theory of knowledge, philosophy of science, philosophy of religion, and social and political philosophy.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English and Diversity
  
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    PHIL 210 - Comparative Religion

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the main religions of the world and helps students to understand the philosophical similarities and differences among these religions. Religious traditions covered in this class may include: Zoroastrianism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Daoism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 215 - Advanced Studies in Formal Logic

    Credits: 5
    Continues to study the quantitative and symbolic techniques used in formal logic. Covers an advanced study of predicate logic and introduces non-classical logics. Students may also review some metalogic proofs and are introduced to topics in the philosophy of logic.

    Prerequisite: PHIL& 120  with a grade of 2.0 or higher and eligible for MATH& 141 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    PHIL 220 - Introduction to Eastern Philosophy

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to eastern philosophies. Helps students understand the philosophical similarities among these philosophies, especially as they relate to reality, value, knowledge, and religion. Topics may include Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Mohism, and Taoism.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 236 - Existentialism

    Credits: 5
    Explores central themes of Existentialism, including personal responsibility, human freedom, the absence of external sources of value, the absurdity of human existence, and the meaning of life. Examines key philosophical and literary texts central to the Existentialist movement.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 238 - Introduction to Philosophy of Human Rights

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to some of the major issues concerning human rights. Sample topics include: Are there such things as human rights? Are human rights universal or are they culturally relative? Are minority rights exceptions to or different from human rights? Do future people have rights?

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English and Diversity
  
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    PHIL 240 - Introduction to Ethics

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to a philosophical study of morality. Helps students to understand and analyze competing ethical claims based on such standards as happiness, duty, human nature, theology, and custom. Questions considered may include: What makes actions right, if anything? What makes anything good or evil, if anything? What, if anything, makes a person a good person?

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 243 - Environmental Ethics

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the moral relations between human beings and their natural environment. Topics include animal rights, population and consumption, pollution, climate change, economics and the environment, and sustainability.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHIL 299 - Independent Study-Philosophy 2

    Credits: 1-5
    Allows students to independently study a topic of their special interest in philosophy. Students meet on a tutorial basis with a philosophy instructor. Credits, topics, and assignments vary according to student-faculty agreement.

    Prerequisite: Two courses in philosophy, a topic that some member of the department is qualified to direct and evaluate, and permission from the division chair and instructor. Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    PHIL 412 - Professional Ethics

    Credits: 5
    Provides an advanced approach to ethical issues across the professions. Topics include intellectual property rights and piracy, truth-telling vs. well-meaning deception, privacy and confidentiality, conflicts of interest and loyalty, self-regulation, and whistle-blowing.

    Prerequisite: Admission into a bachelor’s degree program; ENGL& 101 ; and instructor’s permission.

Phlebotomy

  
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    PHLEB 101 - Fundamentals of Phlebotomy

    Credits: 5
    Students learn the role and responsibilities of becoming a phlebotomist in all types of health care facilities. Students demonstrate knowledge of legal issues and safety precautions/preventions related to phlebotomy practices. Students demonstrate professional appearance, value diversity in the workplace and possess the ability to communicate effectively and professionally with patient and staff. Students gain knowledge of quality assurance and quality control measures and adhere to policies and procedures used in the laboratory. Students demonstrate knowledge of blood-borne pathogens and practice the prevention and precautionary measures necessary to protect all individuals from exposure.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    PHLEB 102 - Medical Assistant Phlebotomy Laboratory

    Credits: 3
    Provides the skills and techniques for venipuncture and capillary blood collections, EKG, physical assessments and vital signs. Utilize veni-dot arms and peers to practice blood collections. Prepare and process samples for analysis. Learn to manage age specific needs, provide customer service, and obtain special collections. Meets the Medical Assistant Phlebotomy requirements to apply for credentialing through the State of Washington.

    Prerequisite: Concurrent enrollment in PHLEB 104  and NURSE 127 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    PHLEB 103 - Phlebotomy Technician Practicum

    Credits: 3
    Under supervision, students collect blood specimens in a healthcare facility, using various techniques such as ETS, butterfly, syringe or capillary methods. Types of patients include elderly, children, outpatients and inpatients, including patients in the emergency room, under supervision of staff. Draws are done by STAT, or routine or possibly send-out testing.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    PHLEB 104 - Medical Assistant Phlebotomy

    Credits: 3
    Meets the Washington State Department of Health Medical Assistant Phlebotomy requirements for applying for certification. Provides basic anatomy and physiology, medical terminology, ethical, legal and regulatory issues, safety and infection control. Learn collection and transferring of blood samples for current industry standards.


Photography

  
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    PHOTO 101 - Beginning Black and White Photography

    Credits: 5
    Stimulates an interest in and furthers the understanding of the techniques and principles of photography. Introduces students to camera lenses, types of black and white film, proper film exposure, black and white film processing, and basic printmaking. Course requires a 35mm film camera.

    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English or Activity
  
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    PHOTO 102 - Intermediate Photography

    Credits: 5
    For students who have learned the fundamentals of film photography. Concentrates on the more complex aspects of exposure, printmaking skills, lighting and composition while increasing photographic concepts and vision. Students refine the aesthetic and technical aspects of their photography. Course requires a 35mm film camera.

    Prerequisite: PHOTO 101 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHOTO 103 - Advanced Photography

    Credits: 5
    For the student who has chosen to use photography as a form of creative expression. Students further refine their aesthetic and technical skills while developing a personal style. Students are directed toward personal projects that result in a portfolio of coherent images. Course requires a 35mm film camera.

    Prerequisite: PHOTO 102 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    PHOTO 111 - Beginning Digital Photography

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the aesthetic and technical theories and techniques of digital photography. Topics include camera and lens operation, memory cards, file formats, exposure, white balance, composition, lighting, creativity, image editing software and output. Course requires a digital camera.

    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English or Activity
  
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    PHOTO 112 - Intermediate Digital Photography

    Credits: 5
    Continues the study of aesthetic and technical theories and techniques of digital photography. Topics include intermediate level exposure, composition, lighting, creativity and image editing and correction techniques. Students begin to develop a personal photographic style. Course requires a digital camera.

    Prerequisite: PHOTO 111 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Activity
  
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    PHOTO 113 - Advanced Digital Photography

    Credits: 5
    Furthers the study of aesthetic and technical theories and techniques of digital photography. Emphasizes the development of a related body of work demonstrating the student’s personal photographic vision. Explores advanced digital camera and image editing software techniques. Course requires a digital camera.

    Prerequisite: PHOTO 112 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Activity
  
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    PHOTO 197 - Independent Study-Photography

    Credits: 1-5
    Encourages students to study and develop independently in their major area of advanced photography. Students develop their own objectives, evaluation criteria, and performance standards in conjunction with the appropriate instructor.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.

Physical Education

  
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    P E 101 - Physical Fitness Lab

    Credits: 2
    Focuses on cardiorespiratory fitness. Uses aerobic machines (ADA) in the fitness center. Lecture and lab activities focus on cardiorespiratory endurance, reduction or maintenance of body fat levels, safe and sound activity principles, nutrition, weight management/control, and risk factors for disease.

    Satisfies Requirement: Lifetime Fitness/Wellness List A
  
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    P E 102 - Jogging

    Credits: 2
    Focuses on cardiorespiratory fitness through jogging on a walking track, campus trails, and in nearby neighborhoods. Lecture and lab activities focus on cardiorespiratory endurance, reduction or maintenance of body fat levels, safe and sound activity principles, nutrition, weight management/control, and risk factors for disease.

    Satisfies Requirement: Lifetime Fitness/Wellness List A
  
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    P E 103 - Total Physical Fitness

    Credits: 3
    Emphasizes total body fitness and focuses on aerobic activity and resistance training. Lecture and lab activities focus on cardiorespiratory endurance, muscular strength and endurance, safe and sound activity principles, nutrition, and risk factors for disease.

    Satisfies Requirement: Lifetime Fitness/Wellness List A
 

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