Aug 05, 2020  
2017-2019 Catalog Addendum 
    
2017-2019 Catalog Addendum [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This section includes a brief description of each credit class offered on a regular basis at Green River College. Classes are arranged in alphabetical order according to the college department that offers the class.

Each listing includes a course number (prefix & code/number), course title, number of credits awarded, prerequisite and academic transfer distributions are also designated where applicable. Common course numbers are identified by an “&” symbol at the end of the department abbreviation.

Course numbers 100-299 are designated for Green River College programs and courses that transfer to senior institutions (transfer is sometimes limited). The 100 series is ordinarily for first-year students and the 200 series for second-year students, but this distinct varies because of differing requirements at other colleges and universities. The 300 and 400 level series are for third- and fourth-year students.

Consult the “Programs of Study ” section of this catalog and your faculty advisor for specific information about each class and about which classes will meet your requirements.

 

Physics

  
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    PHYS 155 - Physics for the Life Sciences 2

    Credits: 5
    For students in college transfer programs, especially those interested in biological or medical sciences. Course develops an understanding of the basic concepts of physics and analytical and problem solving skills with applications to biological systems. Laboratory is an integral component of the course. Teaches the principles of energy flow and conservation, along with electricity with biological and medical applications. No credit given to students who have completed PHYS& 115 .

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  and a grade of 2.0 or higher in PHYS& 114  or PHYS 154  and in either MATH 097  or 1 1/2 years of high school Algebra.
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science or Lab Science
  
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    PHYS 156 - Physics for the Life Sciences 3

    Credits: 5
    Course develops an understanding of the basic concepts of physics and analytical and problem solving skills with applications to biological systems. Laboratory is an integral component of the course. Teaches the dynamics of oscillations, waves, electromagnetism, and light with biological and medical applications. No credit given to students who have completed PHYS& 116 .

    Prerequisite: A grade 2.0 or higher in PHYS& 115  or PHYS 155 ; eligible for ENGL& 101 ; and a grade of 2.0 or higher in either MATH 097 ; or 1 1/2 years of high school algebra.
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science or Lab Science
  
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    PHYS& 221 - Engineering Physics I with Lab

    Credits: 5
    Includes a detailed study of the basic laws of physics. Emphasizes the evolution of ideas from experimental observation to mathematical models. Includes a comprehensive investigation of Newtonian particle dynamics. Laboratory is an integral part of the course.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  and a grade of 2.0 or higher in PHYS& 114  or in a high school physics, or equivalent, and in MATH& 142  or equivalent with concurrent enrollment or completion in MATH& 151 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science or Lab Science
  
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    PHYS& 222 - Engineering Physics II with Lab

    Credits: 5
    Applications of Newtonian Physics to energy, momentum, and extended bodies, as well as the study of electro-magnetic theory. Course develops ideas from experimental observation to a mathematics model. Laboratory is an integral part of the course.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  and a grade of 2.0 or higher in PHYS& 221  and MATH& 151  and at least concurrent enrollment in MATH& 152 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science or Lab Science
  
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    PHYS& 223 - Engineering Physics III with Lab

    Credits: 5
    Study of classical wave properties with applications to mechanical and electrical systems, sound, electromagnetic waves, light, and atomic physics.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  and a grade of 2.0 or higher in PHYS& 222  and MATH& 152  and at least concurrent enrollment in MATH& 153 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science or Lab Science
  
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    PHYS 225 - Modern Physics

    Credits: 3
    Fourth quarter general physics sequence course for science and engineering students. Serves as a terminal course for non-physics majors and gives students a good conceptual background for the study of quantum mechanics. Emphasizes a thorough study of phenomena that cannot be explained with ideas from classical physics.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  and a grade of 2.0 or higher in PHYS& 222  and MATH& 152  and at least concurrent enrollment in PHYS& 223  and MATH& 153 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    PHYS 229 - Electric and Magnetic Fields

    Credits: 2
    Introduces the quantitative laws of electricity and magnetism including principles of electromagnets, electric generators, and electromagnetic waves.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  and a grade of 2.0 or higher in PHYS& 222  and MATH& 152  and at least concurrent enrollment in MATH& 153  and PHYS& 223 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Natural Science
  
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    PHYS 230 - Undergraduate Research

    Credits: 5
    Gives students the experience of doing research in a cutting edge field. Students read relevant literature, pose a question, state a hypothesis, plan and perform experiments to test their hypothesis. Students work in teams and present their work to their peers. The culmination of the project would be a written paper modeled after a journal article.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101 ; and a grade of 2.0 or higher in PHYS& 222  and MATH& 152 ; and at least concurrent enrollment in MATH& 153  and PHYS& 223 .
  
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    PHYS 298 - Independent Study-Physics

    Credits: 1-5
    Students contract with an instructor to study topics not part of a regular class. Topics must be in physics or related fields.

    Prerequisite: One year of physics and instructor’s permission.

Political Science

  
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    POLS& 101 - Introduction to Political Science

    Credits: 5
    Students explore and analyze political philosophies, ideologies, the historical development of political thought, democracy, authoritarianism, and major “isms” (liberalism, conservatism, capitalism, socialism, communism, fascism, political-religious fundamentalism, etc.). Students assess how well each ideology has dealt with social, economic, and political problems. Students explore and analyze why people choose any ideology over others.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    POLS 194 - Special Topics-Political Science

    Credits: 5
    An in-depth study of specific topics in political science or direct involvement in a politically-oriented project. May be in a seminar format or be research focused. Students may be involved in selecting projects and research topics.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  and instructor’s permission required for individual researcher projects.
  
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    POLS& 200 - Introduction to Law

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the legal system through an examination of several substantive areas that interest both business and non-business students. Covers constitutional law, contracts, torts, product liability, and criminal law. Uses business environment perspectives, but also considers general social context within which these laws have emerged. Discusses structure of American legal system and investigates sources of law for that system.

    Prerequisite: READ 094  with a grade of 2.0 or higher; or eligible for READ 104 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    POLS& 202 - American Government

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the American political system - its origins, institutions, and operations. Students analyze and understand politics, power, and resulting policy. Examines formal and informal institutions of government, conventional and unconventional means of citizen participation, and political outcomes. Explores the strengths and weaknesses of various interpretations of American democracy.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    POLS& 203 - International Relations

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to major theoretical approaches in the field of international relations. Explores nations and nationalism, the nature of the interstate system, and power. Includes topics such as diplomacy, trade, economic sanctions, increasing technological and economic globalization, international law, international political economy, labor, the environment, and war.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    POLS& 204 - Comparative Government

    Credits: 5
    A comparative analysis of politics and types of governing systems around the globe (e.g., democratic, authoritarian, theocratic, parliamentary, presidential). Examines power relationships (e.g., race, ethnicity, religion, sex) and citizen rights. Explores and analyzes the political issues and problems in their international, historical, economic, and cultural contexts.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science and Diversity
  
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    POLS 207 - American Political Participation

    Credits: 5
    Examines forms of American political participation. Focuses on such activities as elections, social movements, civil disobedience, political violence, as well as political mobilization activities via the internet. Also examines the causes and effects of nonparticipation. A central goal is to investigate the democratic theories that underpin American politics.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    POLS 209 - State and Local Government Politics

    Credits: 5
    Explores and analyzes histories, structures, processes, policies, administration, and politics of state and local governments. Washington state receives close attention. Explores interest groups, lobbying, campaign finance, electoral politics, policy development and implementation, legislatures, executives, judiciary systems, ballot measures, political personalities, and intergovernmental relations. Students engage current political issues.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    POLS 220 - Food Politics and Law

    Credits: 5
    A comparative politics and law course considering motivations/behaviors of food producers, lobbyists, and members of legislative bodies, including the respective roles of governmental regulatory agencies, as well as case law relevant to food/agricultural issues pertaining to customs, ethics, political culture and the profit motive. The potential effects and implications of relevant and actual trade agreements (actual and proposed/pending).

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Satisfies a social science requirement for AA-DTA degree.
  
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    POLS 225 - The Arab-Israeli Conflict

    Credits: 5
    Explore the Arab-Israeli conflict from its inception until the present. Students will examine key political processes in the development of the conflict and explore the causes for its persistence. Through the analysis of the conflict, students will examine key issues in political science including: state and institution building, nationalism, ethic conflict, economic development, and conflict management.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101   or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    POLS 298 - Independent Study-Political Science

    Credits: 1-5
    Enables students to individually pursue special interests or opportunities to study in political science under guidance of an instructor.

    Prerequisite: POLS& 101  or POLS& 202 , or instructor’s permission.

Prior Learning Assessment

  
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    PLA 099 - Independent Study-Prior - Learning Assessment

    Credits: 1-2
    Assists students who wish to work on a Prior Learning Assessment project. PLA orientation sessions are provided by faculty and support staff. Instruction includes documentation requirements, assessment, transcript rules, transfer information and restrictions. Credits are awarded for demonstrated learning outcomes that are appropriate to a particular course offering. Faculty, as the content specialists, assesses and recognizes prior learning and makes the determination of credit awards. Credit for PLA may be granted only upon the recommendation of faculty who are appropriately qualified and who are on a regular appointment with the college on a continuing basis. Successful PLA coursework will be transcript on a notation basis. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.

Psychology

  
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    PSYC& 100 - General Psychology

    Credits: 5
    Provides an overview of the scientific study of behavior and mental processes in humans and animals. Focuses on the presentation of various scientific theories and supporting research that currently guide the understanding of various aspects of human behavior such as learning, sensation, perception, motivation, memory, emotion, personality, development, abnormal behavior, psychotherapy, and group behavior.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    PSYC& 180 - Human Sexuality

    Credits: 5
    Explores the physiological, social and psychological aspects of sexuality. Covers the major theoretical constructs and empirical data regarding sexuality. May cover research techniques, sexual anatomy and physiology, sexual response, sexual behavior, orientation, relationships, love, sexual communication, sexual dysfunctions, deviations and treatment.

    Prerequisite: PSYC& 100  or eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    PSYC& 200 - Lifespan Psychology

    Credits: 5
    Covers theories and supporting research that explain psychological development from conception through old age. Topics may include physiological development, emotional development, personality and social development, cognitive development, and aging and death.

    Prerequisite: PSYC& 100  and eligible for ENGL& 101 ; or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    PSYC 201 - Personality

    Credits: 5
    Presents an overview of various approaches to personality and their implications for healthy psychological adjustment to the demands of living. Approaches may include biological, psychodynamic, trait, behavioral, humanistic and cognitive perspectives on personality. Presents core concepts used by each perspective, as well as the assessment techniques generated by and used by that perspective.

    Prerequisite: PSYC& 100  and eligible for ENGL& 101 ; or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    PSYC 209 - Fundamental of Psychological Research

    Credits: 5
    Introduces psychological research. Topics include interpretation of research, research problems and design, scientific writing, ethics, and literature review techniques.

    Prerequisite: PSYC& 100  and eligible for ENGL& 101 ; or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    PSYC& 220 - Abnormal Psychology

    Credits: 5
    Covers the diagnosis, causes, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Topics may include defining abnormality, the history of abnormality, and differing theoretical models used to explain the cause of abnormality and the supporting research. Reviews disorders such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, anorexia nervosa, and multiple personality disorder.

    Prerequisite: PSYC& 100  and eligible for ENGL& 101 ; or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    PSYC 225 - Fundamentals of Physiological Psychology

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the physiological psychology and the neural mechanisms of behavior. May cover how neurons and neurotransmitters function, the anatomical overview of the nervous system, how sensory systems and motor systems function, the neural mechanisms of motivated behavior, emotion, learning, memory, and sleep and psychological disorders.

    Prerequisite: PSYC& 100  and eligible for ENGL& 101 ; or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    PSYC 240 - Social Psychology

    Credits: 5
    Covers theories and supporting research that explore the area of social psychology. Topics may include the social self, social cognition, stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination, individualistic and collectivistic cultures, attitudes, persuasion, group influence, conformity and obedience, attraction and close relationships, aggression and helping others, and conflict resolution.

    Prerequisite: PSYC& 100 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    PSYC 250 - Health Psychology

    Credits: 5
    Offers an overview of psychological and behavioral factors in health and disease. Content covers factors underlying health habits, methods to enhance health behaviors and prevent disease, stress and stress management, and patient-provider interactions.

    Prerequisite: PSYC& 100  and eligible for ENGL& 101 ; or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    PSYC 298 - Independent Study-Psychology 1

    Credits: 1-5
    Allows students to pursue a special field of interest in psychology under the guidance of an instructor.

    Prerequisite: PSYC& 100  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    PSYC 299 - Independent Study-Psychology 2

    Credits: 1-5
    Continues project started in PSYC 298 , or a second project.

    Prerequisite: PSYC 298  and instructor’s permission.

Reading

  
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    READ 083 - Reading Proficiency 1

    Credits: 1
    A web-based reading program that addresses the key components of reading at adequate rates with good comprehension. Provides intensive practice in improving visual and perceptual skills, comprehension skills, and vocabulary acquisition. Students’ progress is continually monitored and adjusted. Recommended for students who are preparing for career and program placement or admittance tests. This is a pass/no credit course.

  
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    READ 084 - Reading Essentials

    Credits: 5
    For students who wish to develop a solid foundation of basic reading skills as preparation for college and workplace reading needs. Class builds reading proficiency, reading fluency and vocabulary. In addition to classroom instruction, class utilizes an internet reading program and web site as a means of communication.

    Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score or instructor’s permission.
  
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    READ 094 - Reading Improvement

    Credits: 5
    For students who wish to develop their reading skills for college, work, or pleasure. Emphasizes the identification of main ideas, relevant details, and organizational patterns to improve reading comprehension. Also addresses vocabulary development and reading rate.

    Prerequisite: READ 084  with a grade of 2.0 or higher; or appropriate English/reading placement.
  
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    READ 104 - Reading Mastery

    Credits: 5
    Emphasizes the development of the critical reading and thinking skills (analysis, synthesis, and evaluation) needed for courses in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Presents active reading strategies and study reading techniques.

    Prerequisite: English/reading placement.

Real Estate

  
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    R EST 101 - Real Estate Fundamentals 1

    Credits: 3
    This 33-hour course meets the new state requirements for those who intend to take the Real Estate License Exam. Topics include nature of real property, estates in land, land acquisition, ownership and transfer, contract law agency and brokerage, law and ethics, real estate finance, appraisal, economics, property management, the government and the real estate industry, taxation, real estate ownership operation, real estate math, Washington law, and the real estate industry.

  
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    R EST 102 - Real Estate Fundamentals 2

    Credits: 3
    In conjunction with R EST 101 , this class meets the state requirement for individuals seeking a real estate salesperson’s license to complete a 60-clock hour course in real estate fundamentals. Topics include Real Estate as a Career, The Selling Process, Listing Agreements and Procedures, Agency Law and Brokerage Relationships, Real Estate License Law, and Fair Housing Issues and Consumer Protection. Eligible for 30 clock-hour credits.

  
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    R EST 110 - Varies

    Credits: 2
    A 1-2 credit format (7.5 to 15 clock hours per course). Can be selected to qualify for the 30-clock hour Real Estate Continuing and Community Education requirement, as approved by the Washington state Department of Licensing.

  
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    R EST 120 - Real Estate Law

    Credits: 3
    A practical study of Washington Real Estate Law, emphasizing the more complex aspects of ownership, use and transferability of real estate as encountered by brokers and others who deal with real property. Covers Washington Real Estate Agency Law, Lending Law, contracts, titles, deeds, leases, liens, covenants, conditions, restrictions, easements, estates, probate, and landlord-tenant relationships. Includes a review of significant Washington cases.

  
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    R EST 130 - Residential Appraisal

    Credits: 3
    Focuses on single family residences, small rental units (1-4), raw land for single family residential units and rental units (1-4). Covers the theories, functions and purposes of appraisal. Uses principles and techniques to determine the value of real property. Covers application of cost and market data approaches to residential value for the purpose of purchasing and selling real property.

  
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    R EST 140 - Real Estate Sales Practices

    Credits: 3
    Teaches the why’s and how’s of real estate sales principles so that students can apply principles of selling as they relate to the real estate salesperson. Includes the methods and procedures of listing, prospecting or preparing earnest money agreements. Also includes advanced real estate sales information.

  
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    R EST 150 - Real Estate Finance

    Credits: 3
    Policies, problems and methods involved in financing and investing in various types of real property. Includes taxation analysis, exchanges, sources of loan funds, types of financing methods, institutional and government policies, and instruments and methods of loan processing.

  
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    R EST 160 - Investment/Commercial Appraisal

    Credits: 3
    Subject properties include residential income (five or more units), mobile home parks, offices, shopping centers, industry and warehouse properties, and raw land and development. Covers approaches to valuation in income, capitalization, replacement and cost.

  
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    R EST 170 - Real Estate Property Management

    Credits: 3
    Important functions in building management, residential property analysis, equipment, rental policies, vacancy and rental surveys, lease provisions, inspection, building codes, tenant relations, operating policies and financial result analysis.

  
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    R EST 180 - Office Administration

    Credits: 3
    Practical administration of real estate brokerage, including all managerial functions with special emphasis on brokerage, budgets, sales management, advertising, sales training, market analysis and data processing.

  
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    R EST 206 - Market Data Analysis

    Credits: 3
    Teaches students to prove adjustments by market abstractions, to use various methods of calculating depreciation and to correctly complete the URAR Single Family Residential Report Form. Approved for 30 clock hours by the Washington state Department of Licensing. Meets requirements for advanced appraising instruction.

  
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    R EST 207 - Residential Appraisal Report Writing

    Credits: 3
    Covers current residential real estate appraisal report formats and forms required by most primary lenders, the relocation industry and the secondary money market. Also includes the U.R.A.R. form, the Condominium form, and the 24 small residential income form.


Social Science

  
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    S SCI 100 - Truth, Lies and Social Statistics

    Credits: 5
    Social statistics are not just numbers. They are often created to help explain the nature of social problems and guide personal and public decisions. Examines the creation, use, misuse, and abuse of social statistics. Also emphasizes student ability to critically evaluate arguments that use social statistics.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for MATH& 107  .
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    S SCI 160 - Introduction to the Study of Gender

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the social and historical construction of masculinity and femininity, sexuality and the body, reproduction and the family. Considers the theory and practice of feminist and masculinist social movements. Examines gender as informed by race, class, ethnicity and nationality. Exposes students to historical and theoretical models in the study of gender and sexuality.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    S SCI 177 - Social Science Work Experience 1

    Credits: 1-12
    Allows students to work full- or part-time in jobs directly related to their programs and interests. Students may receive a salary or volunteer.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  and concurrent enrollment in COOP 171  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    S SCI 178 - Social Science Work Experience 2

    Credits: 1-12
    Allows students to work full- or part-time in jobs directly related to their programs and interests. Students may receive a salary or volunteer.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  and concurrent enrollment in COOP 171  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    S SCI 179 - Social Science Work Experience 3

    Credits: 1-12
    Allows students to work full- or part-time in jobs directly related to their programs and interests. Students may receive a salary or volunteer.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  and concurrent enrollment in COOP 171  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    S SCI 194 - Special Topics-Social Science

    Credits: 1-5
    Focuses on a variety of current or long-range problems. Provides opportunities for an in-depth discussion of issues with instructors and specialists. May organize media courses.

  
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    S SCI 211 - Nuu-Chah-Nulth Indians

    Credits: 5
    The Nuu-Chah-Nulth peoples of the Northwest Coast are studied as they are known from historical, ethnographic and informant sources. A field course in conjunction with the Clayoquot Sound Summer Program. Cross-listed with AMES 211  and ANTH 211 .

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  and instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science

Sociology

  
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    SOC& 101 - Introduction to Sociology

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the scientific study of life in groups. Examines the creation and reinforcement of cultural patterns that influence individuals, groups and society at large. Emphasizes socialization processes, social institutions, small and large group dynamics, social inequalities and social movements.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission. Recommended: Eligible for ENGL& 101 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    SOC 194 - Special Topics-Sociology

    Credits: 1-5
    Focuses on one special topic in the current realm of social concern issues. May be repeated when a different topic is presented. Topics may include social movements, such as the Consciousness Movement, the rise of religious cults, violence in the media, aging in America, new social and political power, or youth in transition.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    SOC& 201 - Social Problems

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the study of social problems within cultures, with a primary focus on American society. Examines issues such as social inequality, crime, drug abuse, family violence, population growth and environmental destruction using sociological theories, reasons and possible remedies.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    SOC 202 - Sociology of Food

    Credits: 5
    Using a sociological lens, the relationship between food and humans is examined, focusing on how food production and consumption are informed by social class, ethnicity, gender, globalization, social movements and technological changes. Humans give symbolic meaning to food as more than a source of nourishment; food rituals are embedded in social institutions, cultural patterns and social interactions between individuals which reflect changing cultural values and practices.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    SOC 205 - Sociology of Disability

    Credits: 5
    A sociological study of disability includes the implications of disability on identity formation and social policies. Examination also includes the intersectionality of disability with other categories such as race, gender, sexual orientation and social class. Investigates the Disability Rights Movement, from the enactment of the American with Disabilities Act to the development of the model of Universal Design.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science and Diversity
  
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    SOC 214 - Sociology of Race and Ethnicity

    Credits: 5
    Overview of major sociological perspectives in the study of race and ethnicity in society, including group relations, social stratification, and social change. Students survey theories, data, and sociohistorical/cultural processes useful for better understanding today’s social world. Emphasis is placed on using sociological scholarship to solve modern racial dilemmas.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science and Diversity
  
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    SOC 215 - Survey of Criminology

    Credits: 5
    Covers the history and theory of what causes or contributes to crime, covering the major issues that confront the criminal justice system and studying the social organizations that create and enforce definitions of deviance and crime. Course is interdisciplinary in nature, working primarily from a sociological perspective, but including theories from biology, genetics, anthropology and psychology.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    SOC 220 - Sex and Gender in Society

    Credits: 5
    Explores gender as a major organizing principle in culture, and examines how gender influences sexuality, personal relationships and social institutions, including media, family, work, school and politics. Examines similarities and differences between the sexes primarily from a sociological perspective, but also through historical, psychological, biological and anthropological theories that contribute to understanding gender as a social force.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science and Diversity
  
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    SOC 230 - Sociology of Death and Dying

    Credits: 5
    Examines the connection between culture and the process of death, dying and bereavement. Focuses on how social class, family structures, ethnicity, religion and technological changes influence American customs, taboos, and rituals around death by applying sociological theories.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    SOC 240 - Sociology of the Family

    Credits: 5
    Examines the social institution of family from historical and multi-cultural perspectives emphasizing the use of sociological theories. Specific topics include dating rituals, mate selection, parenting, divorce, family violence and work patterns. Focuses on how families are influenced by larger social forces, such as religion, social class and social policies.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    SOC 245 - Juvenile Delinquency

    Credits: 5
    Examines the history of the juvenile justice system, environmental influences on delinquency, theories of delinquency, controlling delinquency and current trends in juvenile crime. Examines the rationale behind the juvenile system, as well as the juvenile courts. Analyzes the various theories of crime causation including sociological, psychological and criminological theories.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    SOC 260 - Crime and Justice

    Credits: 5
    Sociological study of the extent and causes of crime and a survey of the criminal justice system including the police, the courts and corrections. Gives attention to juvenile delinquency, gun control, capital punishment and violence against women.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    SOC 271 - Sociology of Deviance

    Credits: 5
    Examines attitudes, behaviors, and conditions that violate the current, generally-accepted norms and values in U.S. society. Specific topics include competing definitions of deviance, development of deviant careers, and consequences of deviant identities. Focus on use of sociological theory and the use of social controls.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Social Science
  
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    SOC 298 - Independent Study-Sociology

    Credits: 1-5
    Allows students to individually pursue special interests in sociology under the guidance of an instructor.

    Prerequisite: SOC& 101 , at least one 200-level sociology course, and eligible for ENGL& 101 , or instructor’s permission.

Spanish

  
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    SPAN 090 - Spanish for the Traveler 1

    Credits: 3
    A practical class for beginners (tourists, business travelers, and those learning for their own enjoyment) with very little or no background in the language. Covers basic vocabulary, conversation, pronunciation, and frequently used expressions. Includes practice in speaking and understanding the language of everyday life with some information on the area’s culture, customs, and money system.

    Restriction: Not open to students with more than one year of high school Spanish or one quarter of college transfer level Spanish.
  
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    SPAN 110 - Spanish Oral Practice

    Credits: 4
    Oral discussion of current events, cultural topics and subjects of particular interest to the class. Revision of basic grammar and relevant vocabulary that allows proper oral communication in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  and SPAN& 122 , or two years of high school Spanish or equivalent or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    SPAN 111 - Spanish for Health Care Workers 1

    Credits: 5
    Focuses on developing basic communication skills primarily for health care workers or for anyone desiring a background in the language of health care in Spanish. Students learn introductory vocabulary and grammatical structures in Spanish related to the language of health care.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 .
  
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    SPAN 112 - Spanish for Health Care Workers 2

    Credits: 5
    A continuation of SPAN 111 . Focuses on further developing communication skills primarily for health care workers or for anyone desiring a background in the language of medicine in Spanish. Students expand introductory vocabulary and grammatical structures in Spanish related to the language health care.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  and SPAN 111  with a grade of 2.0 or higher.
  
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    SPAN 115 - Hispanic Activities

    Credits: 1
    Allows students to learn about the multiple contributions of the Hispanic world to the global community. Students are exposed to different elements of Hispanic culture, including music, dancing, and festivals, as well as basic Hispanic history.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Activity
  
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    SPAN& 121 - Spanish I

    Credits: 5
    Begins the systematic study of Spanish emphasizing speaking and listening, basic grammar, vocabulary, reading, writing, and conversation practice. Course requires practice with lab materials.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 ; and no previous background in Spanish, or no more than one year of high school Spanish, or no more than two years of high school Spanish with a “C” average or less.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    SPAN& 122 - Spanish II

    Credits: 5
    Systematic study of Spanish using the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing. Course requires practice with lab materials.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 ; and a grade of 2.0 or higher in SPAN& 121 ; or equivalent with instructor’s permission. The equivalent of SPAN& 121  is one year in high school with a grade of B or higher.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    SPAN& 123 - Spanish III

    Credits: 5
    Completion of basic grammar system, vocabulary, reading, writing, and conversation. Course requires practice with lab materials. Fulfills the University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences graduation requirement.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 ; and a grade of 2.0 or higher in SPAN& 122  or equivalent with instructor’s permission. The equivalent of SPAN& 122  is two years in high school with a grade of B or higher.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    SPAN 194 - Special Studies-Spanish

    Credits: 3-5
    A field course experience in which students improve their conversational Spanish within a cultural framework. Content varies each time the course is offered. Includes actual practice in the language.

    Prerequisite: SPAN& 121  and SPAN& 122 ; or instructor’s permission; and eligible for ENGL 099 .
  
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    SPAN& 221 - Spanish IV

    Credits: 5
    Systematic review of Spanish grammar aimed at communicative competency at an intermediate level. Intensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with special emphasis on reading and reacting to texts that explore the diversity of the Spanish speaking world, as well as the global and local implications of gender, racial and cultural interdependence. Includes a service component through interaction with ESL and International Hispanic students.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 ; and a grade of 2.0 or higher in SPAN& 123  or equivalent with instructor’s permission. The equivalent of SPAN& 123  is three years in high school with a grade of B or higher.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English and Diversity
  
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    SPAN& 222 - Spanish V

    Credits: 5
    Systematic review of Spanish grammar aimed at communicative competency at an intermediate level. Intensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with special emphasis on reading and reacting to texts that explore the diversity of the Spanish speaking world, as well as the global and local implications of gender, racial and cultural interdependence. Includes a service component through interaction with ESL and International Hispanic students.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 ; and a grade of 2.0 or higher in SPAN& 221  or equivalent with instructor’s permission. The equivalent of SPAN& 221  is four years in high school with a grade of B or above higher.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English and Diversity
  
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    SPAN& 223 - Spanish VI

    Credits: 5
    Systematic review of Spanish grammar aimed at communicative competency at an intermediate level. Intensive practice in listening, speaking, reading, and writing with special emphasis on reading and reacting to texts that explore the diversity of the Spanish speaking world, as well as the global and local implications of gender, racial and cultural interdependence. Includes oral practice through discussion of above-mentioned materials.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 ; and a grade of 2.0 or higher in SPAN& 222  or equivalent with instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English and Diversity
  
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    SPAN 272 - Culturas de Espana

    Credits: 5
    Explores the cultural, historical and ethnographic forces influential in the development of modern Spanish culture. Explores the diverse cultural forces that forged modern demographics and cultures of Spain. Includes topics on marginalized cultures, cultural syncretism and cultural hegemony in the context of the Iberian Peninsula. Taught in the Spanish language, all lectures, readings, class discussion and assignments are in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: SPAN& 223  or instructor’s permission; and eligible for ENGL 099 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    SPAN 299 - Independent Study-Spanish

    Credits: 1-5
    Encourages students to study independently in a field of their special interest in Spanish. Students meet on a tutorial basis with their instructor. Course content is decided in conferences between student and instructor.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 ; and a grade of 2.0 or higher in SPAN& 222  or equivalent with instructor’s permission.

Study Skills

  
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    ST SK 101 - Study Skills for the Social Sciences

    Credits: 3
    For students concurrently enrolled in a social science class. Covers learning strategies and techniques that lead to successful completion of a social science course. Emphasizes effective textbook reading, lecture note taking, time management, test preparation, and memory improvement. May cover participation in internet-based discussion groups and library research.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for READ 104  or concurrent enrollment in READ 094 .
  
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    ST SK 103 - Study-Reading Techniques in Science

    Credits: 1
    Improves study-reading skills related to the sciences. Introduces students to valuable information about study-reading techniques in science and stimulating resources. This is an important skill-building course that can influence college success, but does not fulfill degree requirements. Planned or concurrent enrollment in a science course is recommended. This is a pass/no credit course.

  
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    ST SK 105 - Orientation to College

    Credits: 1
    Holds the key to a successful experience at Green River. Introduces first year students, though the course is not restricted to them, to valuable information about personal services, unique programs, and stimulating resources offered at Green River. This is a pass/no credit course.

  
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    ST SK 106 - College Survival

    Credits: 2
    Provides first-time and returning students with specific skills and strategies needed to accomplish their academic goals with greater success. Through discussion, group exercises, and guest speakers, students are introduced to a variety of topics critical to student success: time management, setting priorities, learning styles, campus resources and policies, critical thinking, motivation, and test taking. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for READ 094  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ST SK 110 - College Success Strategies

    Credits: 5
    Emphasizes development of necessary skills for successful completion of college courses in the humanities, social sciences, and sciences. Provides techniques and strategies to improve time management, memory, note-taking, textbook reading techniques, outlining, mapping, learning styles, use of library, test preparation, and test taking. Focuses on how individuals become independent learners and develop critical thinking skills.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for READ 104 , or concurrent enrollment in READ 094 .
  
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    ST SK 199 - Independent Study-Study Skills

    Credits: 1-3
    Encourages students to work on a specific study technique. The technique must increase the student’s understanding and application of study technique to academic work.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.

Technology

  
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    TECH 100 - Careers for the New Millennium

    Credits: 2
    Lectures, discussions and outside activities investigating career development opportunities assist adult learners in making transitions into professional and technical careers and college life. Scheduled in a modular format. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Satisfies Requirement: Activity

Transitional Studies

  
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    TS 011 - High School Equivalency Test Preparation for iGRAD

    Credits: 1-12
    Provides contextualized instruction in basic reading, writing, science, social studies and math to help students prepare for and pass the High School Equivalency test. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Reading CASAS score of 221 or higher, and instructor’s permission. Students must be admitted through iGRAD.
  
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    TS 020 - Transitional Studies Academic Orientation and Planning

    Credits: 1-3
    Prepares basic skills students for success in their program. Students explore learning style preferences, set meaningful goals, and prepare for their content courses. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    TS 024 - Pacific NW & Washington State History for HS 21+

    Credits: 5
    Examines the emergence of the modern Pacific Northwest beginning with the earliest geological creation of the region and continuing with Native American habitation, contact with Euro-Americans, the development of trade and early settlement, the development of an industrial economy, the cycle of 20th century wars and depression, and the post-World War II emergence of the Pacific Northwest. Students who successfully complete this course will earn High school 21+ credits in Washington State History.

    Prerequisite: Appropriate CASAS placement score and instructor’s permission.
  
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    TS 025 - Civics and Government for HS+21

    Credits: 3-5
    Introduces students to the American political system; its core values and principles as set forth in foundational documents, as well as its origins, institutions and operations. Includes brief treatments of political parties, historic development of American politics, civil liberties, plus taxes and budgets. Introduces students to the rights and responsibilities of citizenship and of democratic civic involvement. Students who successfully complete this course earn High School 21+ credits in Civics and Government.

    Prerequisite: Appropriate CASAS placement score and instructor’s permission.
  
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    TS 045 - Language Arts in Life Science Level 5

    Credits: 5-10
    Introduces Level 5 students to the basic principles of life science through reading and writing. Also introduces students to the history and nature of science. Students explore the fundamental concepts of cells, populations, ecosystems, and natural selection. Students who successfully complete this course earn High School 21+ credits in a Life Science.

    Prerequisite: Appropriate CASAS placement score and instructor’s permission.
  
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    TS 046 - Language Arts in Life Science Level 6

    Credits: 5-10
    Introduces Level 6 students to the basic principles of life science through reading and writing. Also introduces students to the history and nature of science. Students explore the fundamental concepts of cells, populations, ecosystems, and natural selection. Students who successfully complete this course earn High School 21+ credits in a Life Science.

    Prerequisite: Appropriate CASAS placement score and instructor’s permission.
  
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    TS 051 - Fundamentals of Numeracy

    Credits: 1-5
    Students learn to understand the language of math, and develop skills to easily accomplish well-defined and structured math tasks independently in a range of relevant settings using whole numbers and decimals. Students also develop basic English language reading, listening, and speaking skills contextualized with math acquisition.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. This is a pass/no credit course.
  
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    TS 053 - Adult Basic Math

    Credits: 1-5
    Students learn to easily select and apply the knowledge, skills, and strategies to independently accomplish well-defined and structured math tasks in a range of comfortable and familiar settings using whole numbers, decimals, and percents. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Appropriate placement score on CASAS math assessment and instructor’s permission.
  
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    TS 055 - Transitional Studies Math Review

    Credits: 5-10
    Students review basic operations of arithmetic including whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, ratios, proportions, place value, roots, and basic concepts related to measurements and geometry. Methods include use of hands-on manipulatives. Study skills incorporate into the curriculum.

    Prerequisite: Appropriate CASAS placement score and instructor’s permission.
  
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    TS 056 - TS Problem Solving for Math HS Equivalency I

    Credits: 5-10
    Study of problem solving, geometry and measurement, exponents and signed numbers. Includes introductory work with polynomials, simple equations, basic descriptive statistics, and graphing.

    Prerequisite: MATH 062  or TS 055  and a valid CASAS score on file with the college, or high school transcript evaluation; and instructor’s permission.
 

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