Aug 05, 2020  
2017-2019 Catalog Addendum 
    
2017-2019 Catalog Addendum [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


This section includes a brief description of each credit class offered on a regular basis at Green River College. Classes are arranged in alphabetical order according to the college department that offers the class.

Each listing includes a course number (prefix & code/number), course title, number of credits awarded, prerequisite and academic transfer distributions are also designated where applicable. Common course numbers are identified by an “&” symbol at the end of the department abbreviation.

Course numbers 100-299 are designated for Green River College programs and courses that transfer to senior institutions (transfer is sometimes limited). The 100 series is ordinarily for first-year students and the 200 series for second-year students, but this distinct varies because of differing requirements at other colleges and universities. The 300 and 400 level series are for third- and fourth-year students.

Consult the “Programs of Study ” section of this catalog and your faculty advisor for specific information about each class and about which classes will meet your requirements.

 

Music

  
  •  

    MUSC& 121 - Ear Training 1

    Credits: 2
    Students study simple intervals, triads and rhythm through a program designed to train the ear to identify and write down simple musical structures from dictation.

    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
  •  

    MUSC& 122 - Ear Training 2

    Credits: 2
    Students continue to study simple and compound intervals, basic four-part harmony, rhythm and pitch through a program designed to train the ear to identify and write down musical structures from dictation.

    Prerequisite: MUSC&121 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
  •  

    MUSC& 123 - Ear Training 3

    Credits: 2
    Continues to study simple and compound intervals, triads and seventh chords in four-part harmony and complete melodies through a program designed to train the ear to identify and write down musical structures from dictation.

    Prerequisite: MUSC& 122 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
  •  

    MUSC 124 - Musical Rehearsal and Performance

    Credits: 5
    Students participate in a musical comedy or drama as a performer or technician.

    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English or Activity
  
  •  

    MUSC 125 - Vocal Couching for Singers

    Credits: 5
    For absolute beginners to most advanced. Students prepare songs in a variety of styles, to sing at least weekly for the class and for a final recital. Instructor works with individual students on vocal technique, style-mastery, stage presence, and microphone techniques. Addresses stage fright and other performance issues. Implements peer evaluations and learning constructive and objective self-critique.

    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
  •  

    MUSC 127 - Green River Jazz Voices 1

    Credits: 1-5
    Prepares and presents choral music in classical, jazz, and pop idioms. Some students may be involved as rhythm section players or sound technicians. Requires extensive performance demands and additional hours for rehearsals and concerts. BY AUDITION ONLY.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English or Activity
  
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    MUSC 128 - Green River Jazz Voices 2

    Credits: 1-5
    Prepares and presents classical, jazz, and pop idioms. Some students may be involved as rhythm section players or sound technicians. Requires extensive performance demands and additional hours for rehearsals and concerts. BY AUDITION ONLY.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 127  and instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 129 - Green River Jazz Voices 3

    Credits: 1-5
    Prepares and presents choral music in classical, jazz and pop idioms. Some students may be involved as rhythm section players or sound technicians. Requires extensive performance demands and additional hours for rehearsals and concerts. BY AUDITION ONLY.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 128  and instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
  •  

    MUSC& 131 - Music Theory 1

    Credits: 3
    Covers the study of basic music notation with emphasis on intervals, scales, key signatures, triads, principles of rhythm and simple harmonization in four parts on the grand staff.

    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
  •  

    MUSC& 132 - Music Theory 2

    Credits: 3
    Continuation of MUSC& 131 . Covers the study of diatonic harmony including the dominant seventh chord, non-harmonic tones, cadences and inversions in a variety of choral and keyboard textures in common practice style. Includes analysis, composition and performance.

    Prerequisite: MUSC& 131 . Satisfies a humanities requirement for AA-DTA degree.
  
  •  

    MUSC& 133 - Music Theory 3

    Credits: 3
    Continues to study diatonic harmony including diminished and half-diminished seventh chords, minor and major seventh chords, simple two- and three-part form, secondary dominants and an introduces tonal counterpoint.

    Prerequisite: MUSC& 132 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 137 - Asian Drumming Ensemble 1

    Credits: 5
    No musical experience required and all students welcome. Be prepared to make noise and play drums! We will learn basic and more advanced drumming techniques of the Korean drumming traditions pungmul, samulnori, and nongak and play the four main instruments: ching, kkwaenggwari, puk, and changgo.

    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 138 - Asian Drumming Ensemble 2

    Credits: 5
    Music experience from prerequisite course required. Be prepared to make noise and play drums! We will learn basic and more advanced drumming techniques of the Korean drumming traditions pungmul, samulnori, and nongak and play the four main instruments: ching, kkwaenggwari, puk, and changgo.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 137  
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 139 - Asian Drumming Ensemble 3

    Credits: 5
    Musical experience required from pre-requisite courses. Be prepared to make noise and play drums! We will learn basic and more advanced drumming techniques of the Korean drumming traditions pungmul, samulnori, and nongak and play the four main instruments: ching, kkwaenggwari, puk, and changgo.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 138  
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 140 - Class Piano 1

    Credits: 2
    Offers basic piano pedagogy in a group classroom situation. Teaches hand positions, fingering, and basic chord structure. Beginning music majors or minors who do not meet piano proficiency must enroll in Class Piano until they meet requirements.

    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English or Activity
  
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    MUSC 141 - Class Piano 2

    Credits: 2
    Offers basic piano pedagogy in a group classroom situation. Covers hand positions, fingering, and basic chord structure. Beginning music majors or minors who do not meet piano proficiency must enroll in Class Piano until they meet requirements.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 140 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 142 - Class Piano 3

    Credits: 2
    Offers basic piano pedagogy in a group classroom situation. Covers hand positions, fingering, and basic chord structure. Beginning music majors or minors who do not meet piano proficiency must enroll in Class Piano until they meet requirements.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 141 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 150 - Private Instruction 1

    Credits: 1
    Individual instruction in voice or on any common instrument.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English or Activity
  
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    MUSC 151 - Private Instruction 2

    Credits: 1
    Individual instruction in voice or on any common instrument.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 150  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 152 - Private Instruction 3

    Credits: 1
    Individual instruction in voice or on any common instrument.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 151  or instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 218 - Concert Choir 4

    Credits: 1-3
    Continuation of MUSC 120 . Students prepare and present selected choral works. Students study the basics of vocal production. One required evening performance each quarter.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 120 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 219 - Concert Choir 5

    Credits: 1-3
    Continuation of MUSC 218 . Students study the basics of vocal production. One required evening performance each quarter.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 218 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 220 - Concert Choir 6

    Credits: 1-3
    Continuation of MUSC 219 . Students prepare and present selected choral works. Students study the basics of vocal production. One required evening performance each quarter.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 219 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC& 221 - Ear Training 4

    Credits: 2
    Continues where the first-year ear training sequence leaves off. Emphasizes the following skills in rhythmic reading and dictation in one and two parts, aural recognition and analysis of harmonic progressions, and sight singing and melodic dictation.

    Prerequisite: MUSC& 123  with a 2.0 or higher, or instructor’s permission, and concurrent enrollment in MUSC 231 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC& 222 - Ear Training 5

    Credits: 2
    Continues where the MUSC& 221  leaves off. Emphasizes the following skills in rhythmic reading and dictation in one and two parts, aural recognition and analysis of harmonic progressions, and sight singing and melodic dictation.

    Prerequisite: MUSC& 221  with a 2.0 or higher, or instructor’s permission, and concurrent enrollment in MUSC& 232 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 227 - Green River Jazz Voices 4

    Credits: 1-5
    Students prepare and present choral music in classical, jazz and pop idioms. Some students may be involved as rhythm section players or sound technicians. Requires extensive performance demands and additional hours for rehearsals and concerts. BY AUDITION ONLY.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 129  and instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 228 - Green River Jazz Voices 5

    Credits: 1-5
    Students prepare and present choral music in classical, jazz and pop idioms. Some students may be involved as rhythm section players or sound technicians. Requires extensive performance demands and additional hours for rehearsals and concerts. BY AUDITION ONLY.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 227  and instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 229 - Green River Jazz Voices 6

    Credits: 1-5
    Students prepare and present choral music in classical, jazz and pop idioms. Some students may be involved as rhythm section players or sound technicians. Requires extensive performance demands and additional hours for rehearsals and concerts. BY AUDITION ONLY.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 228  and instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
  •  

    MUSC& 231 - Music Theory 4

    Credits: 3
    Continues where the first-year music theory sequence leaves off. Addresses advanced harmony, form, “nonfunctional” harmony, and jazz and popular music harmony.

    Prerequisite: MUSC& 131  with a 2.0 or higher, or instructor’s permission, and concurrent enrollment in MUSC& 221 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC& 232 - Music Theory 5

    Credits: 3
    Continues where MUSC& 231  left off. Addresses advanced chromatic harmony, form, and jazz and popular music harmony.

    Prerequisite: MUSC& 231  with a 2.0 or higher; or instructor’s permission, and concurrent enrollment in MUSC& 222 .
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 250 - Private Instruction 4

    Credits: 1
    Individual instruction in voice or on any common instrument.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 152  and instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 251 - Private Instruction 5

    Credits: 1
    Individual instruction in voice or on any common instrument.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 250  and instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
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    MUSC 252 - Private Instruction 6

    Credits: 1
    Individual instruction in voice or on any common instrument. Student pays instructor fee.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 251  and instructor’s permission.
    Satisfies Requirement: Humanities/Fine Arts/English
  
  •  

    MUSC 298 - Independent Study-Music 1

    Credits: 1-5
    Encourages students to study independently in their fields of special interest in music. Each student meets on a tutorial basis with the instructor.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    MUSC 299 - Independent Study-Music 2

    Credits: 1-5
    Encourages students to study independently in their fields of special interest in music. Each student meets on a tutorial basis with the instructor.

    Prerequisite: MUSC 298  and instructor’s permission.

Natural Resources

  
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    NATRS 100 - Introduction to Natural Resources

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the study of natural resources outdoors and in a classroom setting. Explores natural resources careers. Introduces concepts of systems, biomes, forest biology, tree physiology, forest ecology, silviculture, water resources, fish and wildlife management, and Washington forest practices. Students study forest history, forest policy, and forest ownership.

    Prerequisite: ENGL& 101  or instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 107 - Drone Operations

    Credits: 2
    Prepares students for the Federal Aviation Administration’s CFR Title 14, Part 107 remote pilot certification for small UAV (Unmanned Aerial System) operator.

  
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    NATRS 109 - Introduction to Unmanned Aerial Systems

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to the requirements of operating an unmanned aerial vehicle beyond the basic FAA written test. Covers aerodynamics, regulatory requirements, telemetry, communications, weather, aeronautical decision making and crew resource management, physiology, emergency procedures and aircraft performance. Addresses the application of unmanned aerial vehicles and their sub-systems including maintenance and inspection procedures, basic repair including wiring, soldering and basic DC circuitry, volt-ohmmeters, performance and support equipment. At the completion of this class, the student will also be prepared to take the small UAV operator Aeronautical Knowledge Written Test for the Remote Pilot Certification.

  
  •  

    NATRS 114 - Chainsaw Operation and Maintenance

    Credits: 1
    Students demonstrate competency using small engine-powered forestry equipment. Teaches safety, maintenance, repairs and operation of the equipment. Emphasizes how the equipment is used in current forestry operations. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 117 - Aerial Photography Uses and Ground Based Mapping

    Credits: 2
    Studies and uses maps and aerial photographs to interpret vegetation and landforms, measure distance and direction, and navigate. Aviation students become proficient in identifying ground development through the use of aerial photography. Surveys remote sensing technologies used in GIS and Aviation. Course not intended for Natural Resources majors.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  and any 100-level MATH course or concurrent enrollment, and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 120 - Riparian Restoration

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the concepts and applications of stream and wetland restoration. Topics include function and structure of riparian systems, historical conditions of streams and wetlands, an overview of associated plant communities and wildlife, analysis of various management methods, and tools, materials, and equipment used in restoration.

  
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    NATRS 121 - Introduction to Community Forestry

    Credits: 4
    Introduces the concepts and applications of community forestry including the use and care of native and ornamental plants in urban and suburban settings. Topics include an overview of silvics, plant propagation, soils, water needs, pruning, plant health, fertilizers, integrated pest management, regulations and environmental laws, safety, customer service, business management, and greenhouse management. Uses demonstrations and labs inside and outside.

  
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    NATRS 122 - Urban Ecology

    Credits: 3
    Continues and adds to topics learned in NATRS 121  toward understanding synecology in the urban and suburban settings. Uses demonstrations and labs inside and outside.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 121  or instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 123 - Background Watershed and Forest Assessment

    Credits: 12
    A field intensive course that covers uses and management of watersheds and the forests contained therein. Teaches watershed scale assessments from the ocean to the headwaters, backcountry management, and human dimensions of wilderness use including forest harvesting practices across the State of Washington. Topics include land use assessment and management impacts through extensive field exercises in individual, team, and group situations. Students conduct basic trail maintenance, orienteering and examine uses and misuses of backcountry resources. Students create a field journal including a management plan for effective backcountry use. Summer field trip includes base camping, backpacking and/ or backcountry day hiking and field-intensive studies.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 270  and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 130 - Wildland Firefighter Training L-180 and S-130/190

    Credits: 4
    Training for Type 2 wildland firefighters in basic firefighting skills. Complies with Northwest Wildfire Coordinating Group standards for S-190, and S-130 courses, which includes L-180 (Human Factors on the Fireline). Coursework reviews the ICS organization, terminology, and common responsibilities. Includes standard firefighting orders, watch-out situations, human factors on the fire line, suppression tactics, incident response, basic fire behavior, emergency situations, risk management, and fire weather. Includes a one-day practicum. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 131 - Advanced Wildland Firefighter Training S-131, ICS 100-400

    Credits: 6
    Sequence training course for Type 2 wildland firefighters (FF2) in advanced firefighting skills leading to squad boss (FFT1) and Incident Commander Type 5 (ICT5). Complies with Northwest Firefighting Coordinating Group (NWCG) standards for S-131 course work. Coursework is interactive and uses group discussions to evaluate documentation, communications, firefighting tactics and safety/risk management. Requires documented wildfire experience. Includes ICS-100, 200, 300 and 400 which introduces students to the principles of the Incident Command System beginning at the basic level of command structure and functions to advanced levels dealing with escalating and advanced applications of the ICS System in large scale organizational structure and function. Students are taught in accordance with the MOU between Washington Department of Natural Resources and the USDA Forest Service. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 130 or Instructors permission: or proof of certificate of ICS S-130 and S-190; wildfire experience as documented in the NWCG task book.
  
  •  

    NATRS 132 - Wildland Firefighter Crew Boss S-230

    Credits: 2
    Sequence training course for wildland firefighters leading to single resource crew boss. Complies with Northwest Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG) standards for S-230 course. Studies wildfire preparation, mission of the crew, mobilization, leadership, crew management and supervision, fire tactics and safety, offline duties, demobilization, and post-incident responsibilities. Requires completed task book of experience. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 131  or instructor’s permission; or proof of certificate of ICS S-131 and completed task book of experience.
  
  •  

    NATRS 133 - Wildland Firefighter Engine Boss S-231

    Credits: 1
    Sequence training course for wildland firefighters leading to single resource engine boss. Complies with Northwest Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG) standards for S-231 course. Studies wildfire organization, mission of engines, mobilization, leadership, crew management and supervision, fire tactics and safety, travel, and fire business management responsibilities. Students operate engine systems. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 131  or instructor’s permission; or proof of certificate of ICS S-131 and completed task book experience as engine operator.
  
  •  

    NATRS 134 - Intermediate Wildland Fire Behavior S-290

    Credits: 3
    Sequence training course for wildland firefighters. Complies with Northwest Wildfire Coordinating Group (NWCG) standards for S-290 course. A rigorous study of the fire triangle, heat transfer, environmental factors that affect fire behavior, fuels, weather, topography, and changes of weather that affect safety. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 130  or instructor’s permission; or proof of certificate of ICS-190.
  
  •  

    NATRS 161 - Wildlife Habitat Management

    Credits: 4
    Study the management of wildlife and wildlife habitats to encourage incidence and diversity of mammals, birds, amphibians, and reptiles. Students develop field wildlife research projects to aid management skills. Students visit, observe, and participate in actual projects, giving them opportunities to see Pacific Northwest wildlife in its ever-changing environments within the growing research-based industry.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 ; and NATRS 172 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 162 - Biology and Conservation of Birds

    Credits: 3
    Explores the major principles of natural history, avian reproductive biology, population ecology and conservation strategies for hunted and nonhunted bird. Introduces field identification skills and field methodologies through indoor labs and field exercises.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099 ; and NATRS 172  or concurrent enrollment, and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 172 - Computer Applications Overview

    Credits: 4
    Topics include data location collection techniques, Global Positioning Systems (GPS), hand-held data recorders, Excel uses, development of forestry databases, PowerPoint skills, map preparation using Geographic Information System (GIS) software, cost analysis techniques, and development of an employment portfolio. For Natural Resources students.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Recommended: NATRS 100  be taken concurrently.
  
  •  

    NATRS 180 - Natural Resources Measurement

    Credits: 6
    Application of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry to the solution of tree measurement, surveying, mapping, and orienteering problems. Requires calculator with trigonometric functions and capabilities.

    Prerequisite: MATH 070  with a grade of 2.0 or higher and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 182 - Aerial Photos, GIS and Forest Navigation

    Credits: 8
    Teaches the use of compass and chain/tape, mapping, map reading, topography, orientation, area determination, triangulation, the U.S. survey system, note keeping, field reporting, GPS (Global Positioning Systems), pacing and Studies and uses aerial photographs to interpret vegetation and land forms, measure distance and direction, and to navigate. Uses extensive field exercises in individual, team, and group situations. Students conduct basic tree measurements as well as open and closed traverses of roads, trails, and areas. Students apply previously learned mathematical concepts and field skills.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 180  with a grade of 2.0 or higher; and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 184 - Tree, Shrub and Wildflower Identification

    Credits: 8
    Collects specimens and identifies common trees, wildflowers shrubs, and ferns found in Washington forests. Teaches the use of taxonomic keys and their ecological characteristics and growth habits.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 172  and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 185 - Shrub and Flower Systematics

    Credits: 5
    Collects specimens and identifies common trees, shrubs, and flowers found in urban forestry. Teaches the use of taxonomic keys and their ecological characteristics and growth habits.

  
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    NATRS 192 - GIS for Natural Resources

    Credits: 5
    Provides an overview with hands-on experience with ArcGIS tools and functionality in Natural Resources applications. Emphasizes the three principal components of ArcGIS: ArcMap, ArcCatalog, and ArcToolbox. Provides hands-on practical exercises using field data in various formats including shapefiles, coverages, geodatabase feature classes, and raster data. Explores how to use geospatial datasets already available and how to create, modify or build new databases, as well as how to download data from the Internet. Students create, manage, analyze, and display georeferenced datasets and finished maps.

    Prerequisite: Second year Natural Resources student completed one of these courses: NATRS 172  and (MATH 072  or MATH 097 ); or instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 198 - Independent Study-Natural Resources 1

    Credits: 1-5
    Encourages natural resources students to study and develop independently in their special interests. Students must obtain approval on their selected special study project from the instructor.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 199 - Independent Study-Natural Resources 2

    Credits: 1-5
    Encourages Natural Resources students to study and develop independently in their special interests. Students must obtain approval on their selected special study project from the instructor.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 205 - Wildland Recreation

    Credits: 4
    Students learn skills needed to develop and manage wildland parks and recreational sites for private, state, and federal owners. Students visit, observe, and participate in actual projects within the growing wildland recreational industry.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL 099  and NATRS 172 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 210 - Introduction to Soils

    Credits: 5
    Introduces the study of physical and chemical properties of soil and soil ecology. Includes topics on soil formation, plant nutrition, soil water, water and soil conservation, soil erosion and stability, and use of soil maps. Schedules mini labs and field trips to offer hands-on experience. Discusses influence of soils on environmental quality, human health, and forest and agricultural economies.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 172  and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 261 - GIS Tool Applications

    Credits: 5
    Builds on previously learned skills and concepts. Covers several ArcGIS modules within ArcGIS software programs which add analytical and display capabilities to ArcGIS. Students learn to use Network Analyst, Spatial Analyst using Model builder, and ArcScan. Students also learn how to publish data using ArcReader and Publisher modules.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 262 - GIS in the Field

    Credits: 5
    Focuses on ArcPad ESRI software, GPS tools and Survey Analyst modules to collect, create, edit, maintain attribute/spatial information and utilize GIS maps while in the field. Students learn to transfer information between the office and field. Students also learn to create and digitize new features using survey data. Focuses on developing skills while working on research projects in natural resources and conservation.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 263 - Cartography

    Credits: 5
    Provides general introduction to the principles and techniques of GIS cartography for natural resources field based uses including data collected in the field. Reviews fundamental mapping concepts of map design using GIS technology. Students apply concepts of map scale, projection, and coordinate systems. Covers principles of thematic map design for natural resource purposes and a field practitioner and lay person audiences. Students learn new ArcGIS cartography tools and modules, including Maplex, to aid in understanding principles of thematic map design for natural resource field use and audiences. Students get hands on experience using ArcGIS symbols labeling and annotation to make maps and to export maps into different formats.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 270 - Stream and Wetland Ecology

    Credits: 5
    Students gain an understanding of stream, pond, and wetland ecology through classroom and field experiences. Students study stream and wetland dynamics, associated plant and animal ecology, streamflow hydraulics, and Washington Forest Practices Regulations in an applied field setting. Students conduct measurements and sampling within ponds, streams, and wetlands with follow-up analysis and reports.

    Prerequisite: ENGL& 101  and NATRS 172 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 271 - Stream and Wetland Restoration

    Credits: 5
    Stream and wetland restoration is an important issue in water and fish management. Students are given the opportunity to evaluate fundamental ecological processes with the end result being restoration of streams and wetlands. Students look at possible structure and functional issues within the riparian ecosystem. Students develop an efficient and productive restoration project addressing human-induced changes surrounding both aquatic and terrestrial components. Class is taught with lecture, field sampling, demonstrations, and interviews with agencies and private organizations.

    Prerequisite: Eligible for ENGL& 101 , NATRS 100  and NATRS 172  or concurrent enrollment; and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 272 - Fish Identification and Habitat

    Credits: 5
    Covers the classification, identification, anatomy and physiology, age and growth, behavior, life history, and habitat of fish of the Pacific Northwest. Examines the importance of fish in our society and investigates related regulations and policies.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 277 - Natural Resources Internship 1

    Credits: 4
    Internship requires the student to work full time in a paid or volunteer position for an agency or company that will best help the student enhance his/her technical skills and prepare the student for career employment. The student must earn four credits by working 132 hours during the quarter following completion of the second-year Natural Resources courses. Students find and choose their employers and obtain instructor approval before beginning work. Students must have suitable field clothes and equipment for the internship position. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 290  and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 278 - Natural Resources Internship 2

    Credits: 4
    Internship requires the student to work full time in a paid or volunteer position for an agency or company that will best help the student enhance his/her technical skills and prepare the student for career employment. The student must earn four credits by working 132 hours following NATRS 277 . Students find and choose their employers and obtain instructor approval before beginning work. Students must have suitable field clothes and equipment for the internship position. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 279 - Natural Resources Internship 3

    Credits: 3
    Internship requires the student to work full time in a paid or volunteer position for an agency or company that will best help the student enhance his/her technical skills and prepare the student for career employment. The student must earn three credits by working 99 hours following NATRS 278 . Students find and choose their employers and obtain instructor approval before beginning work. Students must have suitable field clothes and equipment for the internship position. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 280 - Natural Resources Internship 4

    Credits: 3
    Internship requires the student to work full time in a paid or volunteer position for an agency or company that will best help the student enhance his/her technical skills and prepare the student for career employment. The student must earn three credits by working 99 hours following NATRS 279 . Students find and choose their employers and obtain instructor approval before beginning work. Students must have suitable field clothes and equipment for the internship position. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 284 - Road and Trail Engineering

    Credits: 7
    Covers road and recreational trail location priorities, location on topographic maps with grade, slope, and property line constraints; Forest Practice Regulations; harvesting and construction equipment; curve computation and field layout; slope staking and cut/fill computation; culvert location; surfaces and drainage; calculations for cut/fill and curves; plan and profile drawing of fieldwork. Uses extensive field exercises in team and group situations.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and NATRS 181 with a grade of 1.5 or higher.
  
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    NATRS 286 - Natural Resources Business Principles

    Credits: 5
    A study of human relations and business activities unique to small independent businesses and organizations. Emphasizes contract supervision and consulting/contracting in natural resources management. Includes study of interactions of individuals, teams and crews, organizations, and business ethics. Teaches the types of ownership, organization, state and federal laws, contracts, taxation, insurance, payroll, finance, accounting, customer relations, personnel management, and negotiation.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 099  or concurrent enrollment; and NATRS 172  or concurrent enrollment, and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 290 - Internship Seminar

    Credits: 1
    For career-oriented natural resources students as a sequential course to NATRS 294. Covers business letters, resumes, applications, interviewing skills, and internship procedures. Conducts mock interviews and actual interviews for spring internships. This is a pass/no credit course.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 292 - Resource Sampling and Appraisal of Forest Conditions

    Credits: 8
    Students acquire skills and knowledge to measure, calculate, and sample resources and forest products to determine value using statistically valid procedures. A rigorous course using skills and knowledge of tree diseases and disasters affecting forest product quality. Includes classroom, field studies and library research.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 099  or concurrent enrollment and NATRS 172  or equivalent and concurrent enrollment and NATRS 181 with a grade of 1.5 or higher and NATRS 182  or concurrent enrollment; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 293 - Silvicultural Analysis and Forest Protection

    Credits: 4
    Study of silvicultural and forest protection practices common in management of natural resources in the Pacific Northwest. Course prescribes specific management objectives and inventories resources and soils. Students design, measure and report a research project by working independently and in groups, indoors and outdoors.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission and NATRS 181 with a grade of 1.5 or higher.
  
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    NATRS 297 - Independent Study-Natural Resources 4

    Credits: 1-5
    Encourages students to study and develop independently in their area of special interest in natural resources. Students must obtain approval on their study project from the instructor.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 298 - Independent Study-Natural Resources 5

    Credits: 1-5
    Encourages students to study and develop independently in their area of special interest in natural resources. Students must obtain approval on their study project from the instructor.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 299 - Independent Study-Natural Resources 6

    Credits: 1-5
    Encourages students to study and develop independently in their area of special interest in natural resources. Students must obtain approval on their study project from the instructor.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 300 - Forest Ecology

    Credits: 6
    Students examine and analyze natural resource policy including environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, and habitat conservation plans. Students appraise and critique administrative behavior, as well as legislative, regulatory, legal, ethical, and personnel considerations as applied to forestry operations in Washington State and nationally. Students discuss and demonstrate applications of Washington Forest Practices.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 128  and NATRS 390 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 301 - Resource Economics

    Credits: 5
    Emphasizes the practical understanding of distribution of limited resources be it financial or physical. Financial topics include forest resource valuation and financial analysis concepts, inflation, risk and uncertainty, taxes related to both property ownership, and business and financial decision making. Students become familiar with parts of a contract including boilerplate clauses and specialized terms related to logging, road building and timber sales. Covers timber sale and unit appraisal. Labs focus on computational problems and associated computer software used in the forest management industry.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 180  or MATH& 141  or higher; or instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 385 - Forest Protection and Disease Management

    Credits: 5
    Teaches students about the various biotic and abiotic disturbance agents that affect forest ecosystems. Students identify important forest insects and diseases of North America, especially the Pacific Northwest, as well as their effects on forest ecology. Students learn predisposing factors that increase susceptibility as well as propose effective management strategies to reduce impacts.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 128  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 386 - Bio Invasions: Invasive Species Management

    Credits: 5
    Walks students through the positive identification of invasive species and noxious weeds in Washington State. Students have the opportunity to learn about non-plant invasives and observe or participate in their management. Students learn sources of invasive species, methods of control and visit sites where biological, mechanical and chemical control has been used. Students learn the ecology behind biological invasions and assess invasive species control in the field. Students participate in mechanical control methods in various locations targeting various invasive species and have the opportunity to observe chemical methods. Students produce an invasive species management plan.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 128  and instructor’s permission. Concurrent enrollment with NATRS 417 .
  
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    NATRS 390 - Environmental Decision Making and Conflict Resolution

    Credits: 5
    Introduces students to conflict theory as applied in complex natural resource disputes including forest harvest in the Pacific Northwest. Focuses on skill development in planning culturally appropriate and inclusive public participation processes, meeting facilitation, and conflict mediation including option comparison for nonviolent conflict management.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 128  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 399 - Natural Resources Seminar

    Credits: 1
    Showcases timely speeches by professionals in natural resource management. Guide students through a review of current topics in forestry, fire, watershed, or soils. Presentations by guest speakers and professionals in the field complement student’s development of writing and oral presentation skills.

    Prerequisite: ENGL& 101  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 400 - Forest Practices, Law and Policy

    Credits: 5
    A core forest resource management course. Students examine and analyze natural resource policy including environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, and habitat conservation plans. Students appraise and critique administrative behavior, as well as legislative, regulatory, legal, ethical, and personal considerations as applied to forestry operations in Washington State and nationally. Students discuss and demonstrate applications of Washington Forest Practices, Habitat Conservation Plans, Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 128  and NATRS 390 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 401 - Advanced Harvest Systems: Cable and Aerial Based

    Credits: 5
    Focuses on in-depth understanding of various harvest systems for the applied forester or land manger. Topics include skyline operations, safety rules, rigging requirements, payload analysis, harvest unit planning and layout. Specialized areas include helicopter logging, Riparian Management Zone (RMZ) rules, Wetland Management Zones (WMZ) rules, Channel Migration Zone (CMZ) rules and unstable slopes.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 335  or equivalent; NATRS 180  or equivalent; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 402 - Advanced Harvest Systems: Ground Based

    Credits: 5
    Focuses on more in-depth understanding of various harvest systems for the applied forester or land manager. Topics include mechanical operations for ground based systems, rigging requirements, payload analysis, harvest unit planning and layout. Specialized areas include helicopter logging, Riparian Management Zone (RMZ) rules, Wetland Management Zones (WMZ) rules, Channel Migration Zone (CMZ) rules and unstable slopes.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 335  or instructor’s permission; NATRS 180  or instructor’s permission; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 403 - Transportation System Design

    Credits: 5
    An intermediate level class for foresters and resource managers in issues and responsibilities relating to transportation systems. Students study road types, standards and design procedures. Includes basic soil engineering, route surveying, reconnaissance and design software. Specialized topics include design and installation of drainage structures, erosion control techniques and methods, and material stockpiles. Covers administrative activities such as road costing, rules, regulations, permits and road maintenance plans.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 335  or equivalent; NATRS 180  or equivalent; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 416 - UAV Applications and Mapping

    Credits: 5
    Explore unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) applications for mapping including methods of data collection, processing, and analysis for agriculture, real-estate, surveying, construction, with an emphasis on natural resources and forestry applications. Gain knowledge of rules and regulations of commercial use of UAVs including federal, state, and local jurisdiction regulations. Become familiar with UAV platforms for data acquisition, software for automated data collection, and software for acquired data post processing. Learn to use mapping software for remote sensing, image analysis, and change detection from data collected in the field.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 172  or equivalent; and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 417 - Resource Management GIS Applications 1

    Credits: 2
    A supplementary GIS lab that accompanies NATRS 386  Advanced Silviculture (GRC only). Students apply GIS principles to generate projects for NATRS 386 . Students build on their current GIS skills and employ trouble shooting and problem solving with the ultimate outcome of successful spatial mapping and analysis to complete NATRS 386  assignments.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 192 . Concurrent enrollment with NATRS 386  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 418 - Resource Management GIS Applications 2

    Credits: 1
    A supplementary GIS lab that accompanies NATRS 493 Advanced Silviculture  (Green River College and Grays Harbor College). Students apply GIS principles to generate projects for NATRS 493 . Students build on their current GIS skills and employ trouble shooting and problem solving with the ultimate outcome of successful spatial mapping and analysis to complete NATRS 493  assignments.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 192 . Concurrent enrollment with NATRS 493  and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 419 - Resource Management GIS Applications 3

    Credits: 1
    A supplementary GIS lab that accompanies NATRS 461 Wildlife Ecology  (GRC only). Students apply GIS principles to complete projects for NATRS 461 . Students build on their current GIS skills and utilize trouble shooting and problem solving with the ultimate outcome of generating successful spatial mapping and analysis to complete NATRS 461  assignments.

    Prerequisite: NATRS 192 . Concurrent enrollment with NATRS 461  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 461 - Wildlife Ecology

    Credits: 5
    Students examine, identify and determine important wildlife habitats and their characteristic plants and animals within an ecological and management context through outdoor application of concepts. Discusses identification of species and habitats as well as life histories and ecology of important species. Examines and critiques scientific principles and management implications. Students organize and carry out a scientific sampling and assessment in the field.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 471 - Restoration Techniques

    Credits: 5
    Examines forest restoration at multiple spatial scales from stand to watershed to landscape levels. Students demonstrate outdoor skills and conduct restoration assessments. Compares goals for biological conservation, invasive species management, carbon sequestration, and economic viability through field trips and applied experience with restoration techniques and case studies.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 128  and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NATRS 493 - Advanced Silviculture

    Credits: 5
    Students learn, through classroom and field studies, woody plant interactions with environmental stresses including changes to stand structure caused by humans, nature or time and selection using genetic principles for improved growth. Students participate in hands-on seedling production methods while applying the theory and practice of controlling forest establishment, composition, and growth. Students assess fundamentals of forest stand development and dynamics and use critical thinking to propose forest stewardship techniques to satisfy a range of possible objectives (biological, economic, and social).

    Prerequisite: ENGL 128 , NATRS 293  or equivalent, and NATRS 180  or concurrent enrollment in MATH& 146 ; Concurrent enrollment in NATRS 418 ; and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    NATRS 494 - Capstone in Natural Resources

    Credits: 5
    Students participate within the community in a hands-on application where they synthesize knowledge and skills to create or construct a desired project outcome for a forestry-related project. Students produce projects individually or in a team, culminating in a public presentation and report.

    Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.

Natural Science

  
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    N SCI 194 - Special Topics-Natural Science

    Credits: 1-5
    Offers non-lab science subject matter that is not part of the regular curriculum. Content varies from course to course.


Nursing

  
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    NURSE 101 - Introduction to Nursing & Technology

    Credits: 2
    Introductory course of concepts related to nursing including methods of learning, study skills, testing skills, time management, campus resources, academic resources, research and the role of the practical nurse in regards to nursing technology and electronic health record.

    Prerequisite: Enrollment in Practical Nursing program and instructor’s permission.
  
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    NURSE 102 - Introduction to Pharmacology in Nursing

    Credits: 2
    Basic pharmacological aspects of patient-centered nursing care throughout the lifespan including concepts relating to pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. Builds a foundation regarding drug classifications and the connection to nursing care. The roles and responsibilities, ethical and legal considerations for drug administration are emphasized. Includes application of nursing process regarding pharmacology, the role of safety in reducing risk of error.

    Prerequisite: Enrollment in Practical Nursing program and instructor’s permission.
 

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